Have a Red Hot Go – Terry Daniher

Australian Football celebrates its 140th anniversary in New South Wales this year after the founding of the NSW Football Association in Sydney in 1880.

To commemorate, 140 coaches, players, umpires, administrators and media personalities from both the Elite (VFL/AFL) and Community level will be inducted into the inaugural New South Wales Australian Football Hall of Fame.

Neil Cordy and Rod Gillett profile the nominees:

Terry Daniher

When Terry Daniher was traded to Essendon for Neville Fields in 1978, the Bombers had little idea what a bargain they had.

At the time Terry had played just 19 games in two years for South Melbourne. The Swans even threw in his brother Neale, who hadn’t played a game, as a sweetener.

Fast forward to 1992 and the Bombers could reflect on one of the deals and steals of the century.

In his 15 seasons at Windy Hill the easy going bloke from Ungarie added another 294 games to his tally, booted 469 goals, won the best and fairest (82’), the goalkicking (79’ and 83’) and All Australian honours (83’, 85’ and 88’ (captain).

But the stellar statistics only tell part of Terry’s story, arguably his biggest contribution was an intangible – leadership.

The pinnacle came in 1984 and 1985 when he captained Essendon to back to back premierships. When the Bombers named their 25 greatest players in 2002 Terry was listed at 11. No mean feat in a line-up that included names like John Coleman, Dick Reynolds, James Hird, Bill Hutchison and Tim Watson.

National selectors also recognised his talents as a leader when they appointed him as All Australian captain at the Bicentennial Carnival in Adelaide (1988) after leading NSW to victory over WA and pushing hosts SA close. He also captained the Sky Blues in their upset win over Victoria in 1990.

Terry was a skipper players loved to play alongside. His relaxed and knock about demeanour hid a fierce competitive spirit. He was strong, versatile and aggressive. When the pressure was on he was a man who could rally his team and lead from the front.

It wasn’t hard to where these traits came from. Terry is the eldest brother in football’s favourite family, the Danihers. He set the standard and Neale, Anthony and Chris followed in fine style. But football people from the Riverina know these attributes weren’t confined to the brothers, with the Danihers it was generational.

Terry’s grandfather Jim Snr was a champion footballer and helped establish the Ungarie football club in the 1920’s.

Terry’s father Jim Jnr was also an outstanding talent. He played Aussie Rules and Rugby League for

Chris & Terry Daniher in their Ungarie jumpers

Ungarie for more than a decade. His league skills were so good he attracted attention and offers from Sydney clubs including Manly-Warringah. The highlight came when he scored two tries representing Riverina against reigning world champions Great Britain in Wagga Wagga in 1954.

Three years after his heroics with the Steeden, Jim and Edna celebrated Terry’s birth and it didn’t take long to realise the apple hadn’t fallen too far from the tree. Terry took to footy like the proverbial duck to water winning several League best and fairest awards playing for Ungarie.

In 1975, the year before he was picked up by South Melbourne, he played for Ariah Park-Mirrool in the South West District Football League under former Swans captain and coach Rick Quade.

After 17 years in the VFL Terry returned to the Riverina as captain-coach of the Wagga Tigers, he led them to five premierships and six grand finals. He also coached NSW against Victoria at the MCG in 1993.

He then returned to Essendon as an assistant coach taking the reserves to a premiership in 1999 and was an assistant coach in the Bombers 2000 premiership. He then worked at an assistant at Collingwood (03’), St Kilda (04’ & 05’) and Carlton (06’ & 07’).

In 1998 he was inducted into the Australian Football Hall of Fame and was named on the half-forward flank in Essendon’s Team of the Century.

Terry was selected on the half-forward flank NSW Greatest Team named last year at the Carbine Club function in Sydney.

This induction earnt him a nomination under the category of Elite Player for the AFL NSW Hall of Fame as part of the celebrations for the 140th year of Australian Football in NSW in 2020.

The Priest’s Family Footy Dynasty Goes Back Over A Century

by Dr Rod Gillett

There’s been a Priest playing footy in the Riverina spanning five generations for over a century.

The focus of this piece was going to be on Wagga Tigers legend and former South Melbourne player Doug Priest – “one of the most highly regarded footballers, coach, and later non-playing coaches in Riverina football” – according to the history of the Ariah Park-Mirrol Football Club 1953-1983 – but then it became apparent that the Priest family football dynasty in the area stretched back over a century.

It all began with Norman Priest in the early part of the 20th century when he started having a kick with Methul in the Ariah Park & District Football Association.

Since then the roll-call of Priests playing football has been Norman’s sons Bob (Betric), Mervyn (Rannock, Ganmain, Wagga), Lionel (Rannock, Wagga) and Warwick (Turvey Park) , grandson Doug (Holbrook, South Melbourne, Wagga Tigers), grandsons Steven and Andrew (both Wagga Tigers), and, now great grandson, Kobe (Wagga Tigers).

The first evidence of Norman playing is in a team photo of 1912 when he was aged 22; it is almost certain that he started playing earlier than that. He later played with Rannock along with his brothers when that team was formed after the First World War

A highlight of Norman’s career was playing in a combined Ariah Park and District team that beat a Sydney representative team at Erskineville Oval in 1913. He was later a league and club official.

Doug’s father, Merv began playing footy aged 14 for Rannock in the district league of the same name in 1932. He won the competition best and fairest in 1938 aged 19. In 1939 & 1940 he played for Rannock on Saturdays and Coolamon on Sundays in the South West League. Then he went off to serve his country in the AIF 29th battalion as a sergeant in WWII; while stationed in Melbourne in 1941 he played Seconds for Footscray in the VFL.

After the war Merv returned home in 1946 and began playing for Ganmain on Saturdays and Wagga on Sundays till Ganmain found out and he had to settle for just playing for Ganmain. He played in the Maroons’ premiership team win over Narrandera and was named best player.

He joined the Wagga club then playing in the Wagga and District Football League as captain-coach 1947-48. His brother Lionel joined him at Wagga from 1947-54.

He stayed on as player at Wagga Tigers as they became known in 1950 and transferred to the Albury and District competition (now known as the Farrer league) until he retired in 1954. In between he squeezed a season as coach of Collingullie, then in the Central Riverina League, to runner-up to Boree Creek in 1953.

Merv captained the Wagga and District league against North Melbourne in Wagga in 1951 and the Albury and District league against North Melbourne in 1952 also at Robertson Oval, Wagga.

Merv and family moved to Holbrook in 1959 to take up a position at the Pastures Protection Board and was instrumental in setting up the Holbrook junior football teams which he then coached for a few years (therefore he was Doug’s first coach). He was also a selector for the Holbrook Football Club.

Doug began playing senior football for Holbrook in 1962 and was a member of the 1964 premiership team under ex Footscray defender Brian Prior that beat Temora.

After stints at South Melbourne in the VFL (1966-69) where he played 26 games, and coaching Ariah Park- Mirrool in the South West League (1970-71) he went to Wagga Tigers in 1972 as coach from till 1976 leading Tigers to a premiership in 1975 over Henty.

Doug played a leading role in the 1977 premiership victory over archrivals North Wagga under the illustrious Laurie Pendrick, with whom Doug shared the competition best and fairest award, the Baz medal.

He retired after playing in the 1978 premiership under ex Melbourne and Glenelg player Colin Anderson, who had taken over as coach from him. He played in four premierships: one more than his father.

Then he begun a highly successful involvement in representative football as a coach and selector at the representative level while continuing involvement at Wagga Tigers in all manner of off-field roles (including president 2008-09) that continue to this day with the club’s history project.

Doug was a State selector in 1979-80 when NSW played in the national Escort championships under Allan Jeans narrowly lost to Fitzroy at the Sydney Showgrounds after leading at half-time. The next season the Sky Blues beat the ACT but lost to eventual premier Richmond by a narrow margin in the next round.

Doug also coached the Farrer league to great success during this period including three State Championship victories, the most notable being in 1980 at Deniliquin when the bush boys beat a star-studded Sydney team coached by ex VFL star Sam Kekovich, then coaching Newtown.

Down by 8 goals at half-time, the Farrer team showed enormous spirit and courage to prevail over their more fancied opponent. This followed previous coaching triumphs in 1976 and 1978.

Following the restructure of the leagues in the Riverina in 1982, Doug took on the task of coaching the Riverina Football league (RFL) rep team in the Victorian Country Football League (VCFL) championships.

Doug bought together the players from old rivals Farrer and South West to defeat the Wimmera league, but to lost by 7 points to eventual champion, the Ovens and Murray league. It galvanized the new competition. He enjoyed enormous respect from the players and coaches in the new RFL.

When asked about his great record as a coach, Doug told me that Norm Smith had given him a copy of his coaching notes when he went from South Melbourne to coach Ariah Park-Mirrool but that working closely with Allan Jeans had taught him about “man-management”.

“Jeansie really knew how to get the best out of individual players while Norm (Smith) was more old school, strong on discipline and values. I learn a lot from both”, Doug told me.

Doug’s sons, Steven and Andrew, have followed in the footsteps of their forebears. Both have played nearly all their football with Wagga Tigers, and between them have won a staggering fifteen premierships!

Steven played in eight premierships, while Andrew played in seven flag-winning teams for Tigers.

Andrew (aka Horse) is the games record-holder at Wagga Tigers having played 423 games; Steven amassed 360 games. Steven also played twenty-two games for the Sydney Swans Reserves in 1995.

Steven won the club best and fairest five times and represented NSW on five occasions including against the VFA on the MCG in 1995. He was vice-captain of the State team that won the Australian Country Championships in 2002.

Just like their great grandfather, grandfather, and father they have served their clubs in various capacities as officials and junior or senior coaches.

Now the baton has been passed to Steven’s son, Kobe, who played in Tigers’ Under 18 team last season. He has big boots to fill, but all the Priests that have come before him have all had the ability and character to be successful as players and contribute significantly to

to the game.

Image: (l to r) – Doug, Steven, Dad (Merv) & Kobe with the football.

TEN HISTORICAL FACTS ABOUT ROBERTSON OVAL IN WAGGA

Robertson Oval, Wagga

This Sunday (8 March) the GWS Giants will play reigning premier Richmond in a March Community Cup match at Robertson Oval, Wagga. The oval has a rich history of hosting international cricket and rugby league matches but it is as an Australian football ground that it is best known. It is the home of the Wagga Tigers and hosts the Farrer League grand final each year. Over the years various matches involving VFL/AFL clubs have been played at the venue as well as local representative games and the Carroll Cup schoolboys’ competition.

Football History Society vice-president Dr Rod Gillett sets out the ten most significant facts about the history of Robertson Oval below:

1. Robertson Oval is the premier cricket and Australian Football venue in Wagga. The enclosed ground is located in the Bolton Park sporting complex where it was previously known as #1 Oval. A grass embankment runs around three-quarters of the oval with a 350-seat grandstand and social club on western side of the ground. The ground has a capacity of 12,000.

2. The ground has a rich sporting history having also hosted international cricket and international rugby league matches. The crowd record is 11,000 which attended the rugby league international between France and the Riverina in 1960 – won by the French 25-14.

3. Cricket goes all the way back to 1878 when a Wagga Wagga team comprised of 22 players played an Australian XI that was preparing for the tour of England. Australia was led by Dave Gregory and included the Bannerman brothers, wicket-keeper J.M. Blackham, and W.L. Murdoch who made 93 runs. The visitors won by an innings and 117 runs.

4. It became an Australian Football ground 1911 when the Newtown club (Wagga team) made the ground its home-base. Federals (formed in 1887) were renamed Wagga in 1928 and began playing home games at the ground. They became known as the Tigers in 1949 when they acquired guernseys from VFL club Richmond.

5. The ground was named after prominent Wagga businessman Cameron McLean Robertson who as the president of the Community Advancement Fund donated funds to Council for redevelopment of the ground. He was the father-in-law of ex-Tigers player and football benefactor John Braid. It was named Robertson Oval in 1963.

6. Two Wagga Tigers players were named in the NSW Greatest Team: ex-Sydney Swans captain and 1995 Brownlow medallist Paul Kelly and former St Kilda champion full-forward Bill Mohr who topped the VFL goal-kicking with 101 goals in 1936. Terry Daniher, who was also named in the team, coached Wagga Tigers to five premierships in six seasons in the 1990s after finishing his illustrious career with Essendon.

7. Twenty players from Wagga Tigers are on the list of NSW’s 500 Greatest Players including Harry Lampe (South Melbourne), John Pitura (South Melbourne-Richmond), Paul Hawke (Sydney Swans-Collingwood), Neville Miller (South Melbourne), Brad Seymour (Sydney Swans), Matt Suckling (Hawthorn-Western Bulldogs), and Kim Kershaw (South Melbourne-Hawthorn).

8. Previous matches involving VFL teams played at Robertson Oval included a combined Wagga team v Hawthorn in 1952 and an Albury & District (forerunner to the Farrer League) representative team took on North Melbourne in 1954.

9. The Farrer League plays it grand finals at Robertson Oval and the final of the Carroll Cup for the secondary schoolboys’ competition is also played under lights at the ground and attracts crowds of up to 1500 spectators.

10. Robertson Oval was revamped in 2012 to meet the requirements of the AFL for hosting matches. It involved extending the ground, a complete re-turf, upgraded change rooms and installation of lights. Two NAB Cup Challenge matches have subsequently been played at the venue, GWS Giants against St Kilda (2013) and North Melbourne and Collingwood (2016).

When Did the Daniher Brothers First Play Together

l-r: Anthony, Terry, Neale & Chris

If you answered at Essendon you’d be wrong.

If you said at Ungarie you’d also be wrong. Although Terry did play with his father Jim at Ungarie.

The first time the four brothers –Terry, Neale, Anthony & Chris played football together on the one team was for New South Wales in a State-of-Origin match against Victoria at the SCG on Tuesday 22 May 1990 at the SCG.

It was the first time a quartet of brothers had played together in a State game.

And in one of the greatest upsets of all time in interstate football NSW beat Victoria by 10 points.

“We had blokes that just kept boring in. We had a real good crack and we just enjoyed it. It was bloody great!” Terry Daniher told Adam McNichol, the author of The Danihers: The story of Australia’s favourite family.

All four Daniher boys were nominated for the NSW Greatest Team but only Terry was included in the team. He was selected on the half-forward flank.

Neale, who had lengthy period coaching the Melbourne Football Club (1998-2007) was named as assistant coach to Allan Jeans.

The Daniher dynasty started when the boys’ grandfather Jim Snr, moved to Ungarie from Euroa where he played in their 1913 premiership team to take up a 740 acre allotment under the NSW Closer Settlement Scheme.

Jim Snr was instrumental in the formation of the Ungarie footy club according to Adam McNichol, the author of The Danihers. He ensured the newly formed club adopted the black and white colours of Euroa for its guernseys.

Jim Daniher Snr proved to be one of Ungarie’s best players in the club’s formative years. He was captain of the 1923 premiership team. The Northern Riverina Football League official history rates him as the best player in the northern Riverina in this period.

According to Adam McNicol, Jim Snr “occupied various positions in the club for many years, including that of patron”. This was also something that Jim Jnr did as well as his son, Chris, who is still actively involved with the club having been coach, and more recently president.

Jim Daniher

Jim Daniher Jnr was an outstanding footballer, both in Australian football and in rugby league. He played both codes for Ungarie for many years. After representing Riverina against Great Britain in Wagga in 1954 and scoring two tries against the reigning world champions, Jim received offers from a number of Sydney-based clubs including Manly-Warringah, but Aussie Rules football was Jim’s passion.

Jim Jnr won three competition best and fairest awards in the Northern Riverina Football League – 1949, 1956, and 1959. He led the Ungarie Magpies for over a decade, the highlight being five premierships, 1950, 1956 and 1959-1961. He was well supported by his two brothers, Jack and Leo, who were integral to Ungarie’s success in this period. Leo won the competition award in 1951.

The three brothers married three sisters. They produced more footballers for Ungarie. Jack’s sons, Mick, Peter (better known as Po) and John, who made their names at Turvey Park in the South-West league, and Mark, Pat and Rodney, sons of Leo. Pat also played in Coolamon’s 1983 premiership team.

Terry Daniher had a celebrated career in football after going to play for South Melbourne in 1976 under the VFL country zoning rules after a season at Ariah Park-Mirrool under Rick Quade.

He played a total of 313 games in the VFL/AFL (19 for South Melbourne and 294 for Essendon) and booted 469 goals. He captained Essendon to the 1984-85 premierships during his period as captain from 1983-88. He played 15 State games (11 for Victoria and 4 for NSW). He was named All-Australian captain at the Bicentennial Carnival in Adelaide after leading NSW to victory over WA and a close loss to South Australia. He also coached NSW against Victoria at the MCG in 1993.

Terry was inducted into the Australian Football Hall of Fame in 1998 and was named on a half-forward flank in Essendon’s Team of the Century.

After Essendon, Terry coached Wagga Tigers in the Riverina Football league to five premierships. He won the RFL best and fairest Quinn Medal in 1994.

Named as captain of Essendon in 1982, Neale Daniher became the Bombers’ youngest-ever captain in their history but he had badly injured his knee in round 21 against South Melbourne. He underwent reconstructive surgery during grand final week. He was not to play a senior game again until round 9 1985. He never really fully recovered from the injury for which he had multiple operations.

However, he did recover sufficiently to join his brothers in the NSW Origin team that beat Victoria in 1991 and to play more games for Essendon including one game with all his brothers.

Neale played 82 games for Essendon in two stints punctuated by injury, 1979-85 and 1989-90. He represented Victoria twice and NSW just that one time. He won Essendon’s best and fairest in 1981.

After a stint as an assistant and Reserves coach at Essendon, Neale was appointed coach of the Melbourne Football Club in 1998. In 2000 he got the Demons into the grand final but were beaten by Essendon led by his old coach Kevin Sheedy. He coached the Dees until 2007 securing 108 wins from 223 games.

He is currently waging a courageous campaign against Motor-Neurone Disease (MND) and has been instrumental in fund-raising efforts that have raised millions of dollars for research into the disease.

Anthony Daniher, better known as “Ants” (never Tony as the Melbourne media called him) has the unique distinction of playing over one hundred games for two VFL/AFL clubs: South Melbourne/Sydney Swans (115) and Essendon (118).

“Ants” went to the Swans under the zoning rules in 1981 after stints at Ungarie, Turvey Park (when he moved to Wagga to do a wool-classing course) and Ganmain, then under former Carlton player and 1961 Coleman medallist, “Turkey” Tom Carroll.

He transferred to Essendon in 1987 where he consolidated his position as a key defender and was named the All-Australian full-back in 1991. He played in the Bombers grand final team that lost to Collingwood in the first-ever AFL grand final in 1990. He played five State games for NSW.

Like his antecedents Anthony also became highly involved in football at the local level and became a junior coach at the Aberfeldie footy club in Melbourne’s north-west suburbs after retiring in 1994. Two of his sons, Darcy and Joe have played with Essendon under the father-son rule.

The youngest brother, Chris, went to Essendon in 1987 and played 124 games and kicked 40 goals in a ten-year stay. He was a member of the famous “Baby Bombers” premiership team in 1993.

He played four games for NSW including Origin wins over Victoria and Queensland.

After finishing his AFL career, Chris returned to the family farm, and to play again for Ungarie. He led the Magpies to premierships in 2000-2001 and just like his father Jim and his brother Terry (1974) won Northern Riverina FL competition best and fairest awards in 2000-2002, and again in 2004.

As well, Chris coached Temora and Mangoplah-Cookardinia United in local competitions. But his primary focus has been the Ungarie footy club where he has served in various roles both on and off the field.

“I want to keep it going so my kids can play footy at home rather than folding and having to drive another half-hour to play with someone else”, he told the author of The Danihers.

In 2019 Ungarie are still a constituent member of the Northern Riverina Football League. Chris retired at the end of last season. His youngest son, Logan, is currently playing in the Under 13s, while eldest son, Harvey, is expected to return home for next season.

POST-SCRIPT:

The NSW AFL History Society expresses its condolences to the Daniher family on the passing of Jim Jnr in May this year. He was secretary of the Northern Riverina Football league for many years and was the delegate to the NSW Country AFL where he developed an association with our president Ian Granland (then Executive Officer of the country body) and vice-president Rod Gillett (who was President at that time).