– The Report of 1963

Rhys Giddey - NSWANFL Secretary 1963-64
Rhys Giddey – NSWANFL
Secretary 1963-64

In early 1963 the NSW Football League formed a committee to investigate ways of improving the code in New South Wales and most particularly in Sydney.

Football had had its ups and downs but thankfully this group felt the need to push the game in a better direction.

Looking at the names involved in the league’s management committee that year one stands out and that is Rhys Giddey.  He grew up in Western Sydney and was formerly a ruckman with the Western Suburbs Club who later transferred to the then new Bankstown side (1958-62) that played out of Memorial Oval.  In those years Giddey described himself as a ‘teacher’.

As a player, Giddey was all arms and legs but gave no quarter if it came to who was in charge on the field.  He was a big man.  In many circles his business judgement perhaps did not get the respect it eventually deserved and in not so many years he had ditched football to become a millionaire in the business world.

But nevertheless he moved from a player with Bankstown to a member of the League’s Board of Management in 1962 during a period of absolute turmoil for the competition.

At the time it was subject to litigation from a former league secretary and the league itself was broke after what seemed a generation of debt;  but no-one seemed to care, they just kept rolling along season after season continuing declaring a debit balance, a situation that was quite the opposite to what happened in 1954 when a healthy profit was revealed.  For a league this size, these figures were big money in those days.  The average yearly wage for male managers and clerks in 1950 was £433 1s 4d

 

1954 +£856.00 1959 -£83.00
1955 -£256.00 1960 -£473.00
1956 -£373.00 1961 -£285.00
1957 -£47.00 1962 -£543.00
1958 -£369.00 1963 -£37.00
These figures have been rounded off

 

Giddey declared in his 1963 report to the league as fulltime secretary (General Manager):
“ …. it has also been under pressures which, in 60 years, had not previously been experienced.

The season saw the League once again with a new Secretary, the third in as many years and also saw the unprecedented action of the immediate past Secretary issuing three writs against members of the Board, a writ against the President, together with a summons against the members of the Board. The writ against the President and two of the other writs have had judgment signed in favour of the defendants. The latest writ and the summons is still current….”

The group charged with formulating the report was the NSWANFL Advisory Board, sometimes seen as a bunch of old timers whose opinions really did not count.   The Advisory Board was somewhere to park these men who had formerly been involved in the game.

But this time their beliefs did count and they tabled their report in late August 1963.

The league then was comprised of only eleven clubs:
Western Suburbs, Newtown, North Shore, Eastern Suburbs, St George, Sydney Naval, Sydney University, South Sydney, Balmain, Liverpool/Bankstown (they combined at the start of 1963) and new club Parramatta.

Over the previous number of years then, there had been six or so stand out clubs: Western Suburbs, Sydney Naval, St George, Eastern Suburbs, Newtown and North Shore, then came the rest.

It was reported that the calibre of the bottom five clubs was “sub-standard” and Giddey said

“…in the main, the Senior League Clubs are run by men with some commercial acumen. These men realise that there is no such thing as a stable position – that you either progress or fall behind. The onus is on the executive of all Clubs to consider the affairs of their Club in the light of this axiom.

He continued in what is very positive and futuristic speak “…The time has come when the people holding office in the Clubs must consider and equate the interests of their Club in relation to the overall aims and objects of the League which they go to make up.

It is to be regretted that the majority of the Senior League Clubs have shirked their responsibilities in regard to the promotion of Third Grade teams. This short-sighted attitude is flying in the face of established precedent. Every successful Senior Club has always been supported by a strong Junior Team.”

The report forecast two divisions in Sydney.  “It would” the report said “ensure a better standard of play in what would be the number one division.”

Of course history will record that it all came to nothing.  Even Giddey’s words of encouragement fell on deaf ears.

Clubs in that time of democratic administration, had two votes apiece plus that of each board member so with the five clubs subject to relegation representing ten votes together with any sympathetic life member (life members also had a vote at league meetings) there was no chance the system could be changed.

So the strong got stronger and the weak stumbled through.  A second division was not introduced until 1971 and even then it was more made up of new clubs within the Sydney area.  At the same time new leagues also began to pop up in areas forever considered rugby strongholds in the state.

But time changes everything.

Who would ever think in 1963 that today four of the clubs are no more, another has joined with one of the newer clubs while a ‘fringy’, having gone through so many name changes will probably never aspire to the senior league, not that they would probably want to.

When Giddey said in 1963 “The Board will consider carefully the possibility of promoting football in suburban areas which fringe the city Clubs.” Basically he was right, although ‘the Board’ didn’t do any promoting of football in the burgeoning areas of Sydney and beyond.  It was footy people who moved there to start new clubs for the most part with little or no assistance, that changed the character and the structure of the league and football in NSW.

There have been about four published reviews of Sydney football over the years with this one in 1963, the first.

Most contained idealistic words of growth, development and success.

In 2017 football is definitely better; the competitions are better structured and there is a more diverse group of people running the game now who appear much more informed generally.

Ref.
NSWAFL Annual Reports 1954-64
SMH 25 August 1963
State Library of Victoria, Wages in Victora

Grand Final Time in Sydney

Premiership favourites, East Coast Eagles, had a mortgage on the premiership a couple of years ago, that was before they made what could be described as the ill-fated and expensive shift to the NEAFL where they played as ‘Sydney Hills’.

They won the flag in 2009-10 & 11 after being defeated in the 2008 and 2006 grand finals, the latter following a season without loss but they did managed to eclipse the reserves premiership.

Clubs in Sydney have come and gone, who could imagine the most successful until very recent years, Newtown, would slide out of the competition? And for that matter, Sydney or Sydney Naval, as they were known as from 1944 and here was a club that was formed in 1881.

For the most part, the shift in population shows a shift in football domination.

Gone are those inner city clubs like Sydney, Newtown, South Sydney and Eastern Suburbs.

And the grand final venues. Many have been tried including Erskineville Oval (new and old), RAS Showground, SCG No. 1 & 2, Kensington Pony Track, Henson Park and of course the ever popular, Trumper Park.

Here was a ground that had an almost magnetic appeal to both players and spectators. The players who liked the confinement of a small ground and amphitheatre like atmosphere and the spectators who were always close to the play whether in the stand (old and new – since demolished) or on the hill.

Former league secretary, Rhys Giddey made headlines in 1963 when he declared the attendance at the Western Suburbs v Newtown grand final of over 11,000. He later confided that it all made good reading in the newspaper. Trouble is these written suppositions become fact.

There were other big crowds recorded at Trumper Park, including one of 10,000 in the early fifties when NSW played a visiting side. Again, the League’s ability to accurately record attendance numbers was very limited.

And to Blacktown, the current venue for finals matches. Despite the centre of Sydney now recorded west of Parramatta, getting crowds to Blacktown does present a challenge. The facilities are good but nevertheless it is a long way for those used to watching the game closer to town.  Last year’s premier division crowd was recorded at ‘around’ 1000.

One way is to compare the gate takings and while there has been a variance in the entry fee over the years, it is still an indicator of crowd numbers. It would be interesting to dig deeper for the reason of the large disparity between 2009 and 2010 -.  Click image to enlarge.

Sydney Grand Final Gate Takings small

 

 

 

Other records of crowd numbers were kept, but not maintained. Here is a graph of gate takings from 1930-60.  Click image to enlarge.

Sydney Football Attendance I small

1963 Sydney Grand Final

1963 Wests Coach, Neil Wright smallThe story of the Sydney 1963 grand final is worth telling.

This was the time of only one division in Sydney with three grades, first, reserves and under 19.

Like all competitions you had the winners and the losers, the well run clubs and those, for whatever reason, that struggled.

The league had just come through a rather tumultuous period.  Just previous to this the fulltime secretary had been suspended, the treasurer had resigned, the books were in an absolute mess and then the stand-in permanent secretary got his marching orders resulting in court action.  The league began the season £500 in the red ($13,500 in today’s money).

Ern McFarlane, that “hail fellow, well met” long term Newtown official and player, who didn’t mind a drink, had taken the reigns in 1961 and was in the chair during all of this upheaval.

Besides this the league underwent some change, but not enough;  The had tried a 16 aside competition which was continually denounced until they returned to the status quo.

And then there was the obvious disparity in the standard of the competition and while two divisions were discussed, it never happened with the next year resulting in the amalgamation of some clubs.  That too eventually failed.

It was a time when the University club was coming out of its recession and UNSW was just about to emerge as their own entity so if the league had bitten the bullet, maybe Sydney football could have been different rather than waiting until the early 1970s and the introduction of a second division.

A former Western Suburbs then Bankstown ruckman, Rhys Giddey, who was a member of the league’s administration, took over the fulltime secretary’s position working out of what could only be described as a very disorganised brick building at Trumper Park – since demolished.

1963 Balmain v Parramatta thumbnailHe soon moved the offices to a ‘suite’ (room) at 307 Sussex Street in the city.

Action image shows Balmain’s captain-coach, Ray Rocher marking in front of a Parramatta opponent in a match during the season.  Click to enlarge.

The final four was a reasonably close finish.  Wests, well recognized as the money club following its successful venture to a licensed club, finished on top with 56 points, then came North Shore on 48, Sydney Naval on 46 and Newtown on 44.

Wests scored an easy win over North Shore in the second semi to move into the grand final while Newtown on the other hand battled their way from fourth with a first semi win, then a preliminary final victory over Norths to reach the decider.

The scene was set and a fine day brought out a big crowd at Trumper Park, allegedly eclipsing any that had previously attended an Australian football game at the ground, and were in for a treat.

Never one to let an opportunity pass, league secretary, Giddey told the press that the crowd totalled 11,377 who paid £2,235 though the gate.  It was later revealed that Rhys could be a bit loose with the truth freely admitting to his over zealous statement in the years that followed.

Unfortunately for Wests they had their strapping 1.94cm ruckman coach, former VFA representative player, Neil Wright in hospital with hepatitus A.  Wright had played a big part in the Magpies success and was one of their best in the second semi.  He had coached country club Finley the year before.

Newtown had as their captain and coach, the big policeman in Ellis Noack, a current member of the History Society.

As was the norm for Sydney grand finals it started with a fight, but it never really ended there, the conflict continued throughout the game.  The main target of Newtown’s attack was Western Suburbs fullback, Ray Sharrock, a wonderful player from the RAAF who had won the Phelan Medal in the same year.  In one incident, Sharrock had cleared the ball downfield when a Newtown ruckman ran 20 metres to strike him from behind, knocking Sharrock to the ground, unconscious.

On two occasions, spectators twice fired beer cans onto the field which stopped play for some time.  Not long after that a Wests player heavily dumped the opposition player who had attacked Sharrock and so it was on again.1963 Ray Sharrock small

Newtown’s Gordon Hancock and John Griffiths from Wests were reported during the game for fighting.

At the first break Newtown led 4-5 to 2-2 increasing their lead to 7-9 to 4-4 by half time.  An upset was on the cards.

But Newtown could not sustain their opponents third term onslaught;  at one stage Wests hit the front but Newtown countered to hold a nine point lead at the final change.

Early in the last quarter Western Suburbs piled on five quick goals and it was only for the sheer talent and determination of Sharrock at fullback that kept Newtown regaining the lead.  His finger tip marking was a sight to see.

By this time secretary Giddey had called the police who came en-mass lining the ground as well as the players race.  Giddey himself came inside the fence line waiting for the bell to ring thinking his presence could contain any further violence.  Giddey was a big man.

Wests won the game by 10 points 14-14 (98) to 12-16 (88).  As soon as the match finished so too did the violence.  The win gave Wests their second flag since their re-entry into the competition in 1948.

What Happened in 1963

1963 Neil Wright - Wests coach smallAll years in Sydney football are different but 50 years ago, 1963 just appeared to be that little bit different.

A year after 2UW broadcast the VFL Grand Final in Sydney in what can only be described as a very unique media event, the league started the year five hundred pounds ($1,000) in the red.  Prior to this the league finished 1962 with a deficit of five hundred and forty three pounds ($1086.00), four hundred and one pounds ($802.00) in 1961 and three hundred and seventy five pounds ($750.00) in 1960. This may not sound like much money today but back then, they were almost insurmountable figures for a struggling code.

Former Western Suburbs and Bankstown player, Rhys Giddey had been appointed the league’s secretary working out of a small building at Trumper Park.  He went on to assume a fulltime appointment in the position.

1963 followed at least one season of administrative turmoil and because the previous (honorary) secretary had been summarily dismissed in mid January (1963) officials failed to get hold of any of the financial records until nearly three months in so a set of unaudited accounts were presented to members at the AGM.

The league certainly had their problems.

On the club scene, calls for a two division system were ignored.  The Liverpool and Bankstown clubs amalgamated which reduced the competition to eleven clubs, necessitating a bye and there were suggestions that two other unnamed clubs should also amalgamate. It didn’t happen.

However the league engineered the draw so that the top teams from 1962 played each other twice as did the lower five clubs.  Top and bottom sides then only had to meet on one occasion.  This ensured the presentation of the game overall at a generally higher standard with the lower clubs meeting under more equitable conditions.

Western Suburbs were hailed as the glamour club upon the construction of their licensed premises fronting onto Picken Oval was complete.

The club signed a former VFA player, ruckman Neil Wright (pictured) as their coach on a four figure fee, something unheard of in Sydney football.  This is when St George paid their ex-VFL coach two hundred and fifty pounds ($500) and South Sydney paid theirs, one hundred pounds ($200).  Wests also openly announced that it would pay both their first AND reserve grade players.  Another exceptional occurrence in the league.

In total the Magpies had fifteen new players from interstate and country areas.  They also afforded the top dressing their Picken Oval ground for the season.

Then on the eve of the finals Wests were hit with a savage blow when coach Wright was admitted to Prince Henry Hospital with hepatitis.  His place was taken by former club captain, Peter Kuschert.

Meanwhile, Hurstville Council decided to call for tenders for a large scale development of Olds Park and the St George Club was one which submitted a proposal for a successful 21 year lease for the site.

Rain forced the postponement of all round 4 matches in late April

The Parramatta club got themselves into strife in a match against St George in early May when they played 16 unregistered players.  These were all former players with Liverpool which had amalgamated with Bankstown and their registration was locked into the last placed, Liverpool/Bankstown Club.  Parramatta were fined a hefty fifty pounds ($100).

In May, St George took the opportunity to travel to Newcastle on their bye weekend where they defeated the Hamilton Club 8.15 (63) to 6.11 (47).  A week later they scored an impressive 15.15 (105) to 0.2 (2) win over Eastern Suburbs at Trumper Park, however in mid June they too had a shock when a last minute goal by Sydney University’s John Weissel gave the students a rare win over the Saints.

The East’s loss was their greatest in the club’s history and many attributed the atrocious weather conditions as one of the reasons for their poor performance.

Most fans chuckled quietly in round 6 when Parramatta included an untried 199.5cm American, Harvey Haddock in their side to meet Eastern Suburbs.  Hadock was a sailor on the USS aircraft carrier, Coral Sea which was visiting Sydney.  Easts won 17.7 (109) to 13.14 (92).  Hadcock battled to get a kick.

NSW played three interstate games that year and lost the lot.  A two goal loss to Queensland in Brisbane, an eleven point defeat by the ACT in Canberra and an eight goal loss to Combined Universities on the June long weekend.

On 14 July, Eastern Suburbs backman, John Grey was charged with kicking boundary umpire Leo Farley in a game against St George.  Grey was outed by the Tribunal for five years.

Burly Newtown captain-coach, Ellis Noack won the league’s goalkicking with 55 majors while versatile, Western Suburbs fullback, Ray Sharrock, who played most of the season in a back brace, won the Phelan Medal.

Sharrock was instrumental in his club’s grand final victory over Newtown before a record crowd at Trumper Park.  League secretary, Rhys Giddey gave the attendance as 11,337 but admitted years later that he may well over liberally over-estimated the number.

As in many of Sydney’s grand finals, the 1963 version was no exception  It opened sensationally with an all-in brawl after an incident in the ruck snowballed and players from all parts of the field rushed to join in the melee.

Players from both sides stood trading punches until central umpire Mal Lee together with goal and boundary umpires separated them.

Newtown’s Gordon Hancock, in later years a leading figure in the Bankstown Sports club, was reported for striking and Wests John Griffiths was charged with kicking.  Wests won 14.14 (98) to Newtown’s 12.16 (88)  after the Magpies were down by nine points at the final change.

The league cancelled the proposed 15 September two hundred and fifty pound ($500), Premiers v The Rest Game and replaced it with a final of the post season knock-out competition between St George and South Sydney.

Not to spoil their poor record, the league again finished the 1963 season in the red.  This time though it was a much more manageable figure of thirty seven pounds ($74.00)

1963 – 2

Sherrin angle with 1963 grey backgroundAll seasons in Sydney football are different but 50 years ago, 1963, just appeared to be that little bit different again.

A year after 2UW broadcast the VFL Grand Final in Sydney in what can only be described as a very unique media event, the league started 1963 five hundred pounds ($1,000) in the red.  Prior to this the league finished 1962 with a deficit of five hundred and forty three pounds ($1086.00), four hundred and one pounds ($802.00) in 1961 and three hundred and seventy five pounds ($750.00) in 1960. This may not sound like much money today but back then, they were almost insurmountable figures for a struggling code.

Former Western Suburbs and Bankstown player, Rhys Giddey had been appointed the league’s secretary working out of a small building at Trumper Park.  He went on to assume a fulltime appointment in the position.

1963 followed at least one season of administrative turmoil and because the previous (honorary) secretary had been summarily dismissed in mid January (1963) then officials failed to get hold of any of the financial records until nearly three months in, so a set of unaudited accounts were presented to members at the AGM.

The league certainly had their problems.

On the club scene, calls for a two division system were ignored.  The Liverpool and Bankstown clubs amalgamated which reduced the competition to eleven clubs.  This necessitated a bye and there were suggestions that two other unnamed clubs should also amalgamate.It didn’t happen.

However the league engineered the draw so that the top teams from 1962 played each other twice as did the lower five clubs.  Top and bottom sides then only had to meet on one occasion.  This ensured the presentation of the game at a generally higher standard overall with the lower clubs “meeting under more equitable condi1963 Neil Wright - Wests coach smalltions.”

Western Suburbs were hailed as the glamor club upon the construction of the only Sydney licensed premises fronting onto Picken Oval.

The club signed a former VFA player, ruckman Neil Wright as their coach on a four figure fee, something unheard of in Sydney football.  This was when St George paid their ex-VFL coach two hundred and fifty pounds ($500) and South Sydney paid theirs, one hundred pounds ($200).  Wests also openly announced that it would pay both their first AND reserve grade players.  Another exceptional occurrence in the league and made it difficult for other clubs.

In total the Magpies had fifteen new players from interstate and country areas in 1963.  They also afforded the top dressing of their Picken Oval ground in preparation for the season.

Then on the eve of the finals Wests were hit with a savage blow when coach Wright was admitted to Prince Henry Hospital with hepatitis.  His place was taken by former club captain, Peter Kuschert.

Meanwhile, Hurstville Council decided to call for tenders for a large scale development of Olds Park and the St George Club was one which submitted a proposal for a 21 year lease for the site.

Rain forced the postponement of all round 4 matches in late April.

The Parramatta club got themselves into strife in a match against St George in early May when they played 16 unregistered players.  These were all former players of the Liverpool club which had since amalgamated with Bankstown and the players’ registration was locked in with the last placed, Liverpool/Bankstown Club.  Parramatta were fined a hefty fifty pounds ($100).

In May, St George took the opportunity to travel to Newcastle on their bye weekend where they defeated the Hamilton Club 8.15 (63) to 6.11 (47).  A week later they scored an impressive 15.15 (105) to 0.2 (2) win over Eastern Suburbs at Trumper Park, however in mid June they too had a shock when a last minute goal by Sydney University’s John Weissel gave the students a rare win over the Saints.

The East’s loss was their greatest in the club’s history and many attributed the atrocious weather conditions as one of the reasons for their poor performance.  It was a poor season for Easts, finishing second last.

Most fans chuckled quietly in round 6 when Parramatta included an untried 199.5cm American, Harvey Haddock in their side to meet Eastern Suburbs.  Hadock was a sailor on the USS aircraft carrier, Coral Sea which was visiting Sydney.  Easts won 17.7 (109) to 13.14 (92).  Hadcock battled to get a kick.

NSW played three interstate games that year and lost the lot.  There was a two goal loss to Queensland in Brisbane, an eleven point defeat by the ACT in Canberra and an eight goal loss to Combined Universities on the June long weekend at Trumper Park.

On 14 July, Eastern Suburbs backman, John Grey was charged with kicking boundary umpire Leo Farley in a game against St George.  Grey was subsequently outed by the Tribunal for five years.

Burly Newtown captain-coach, Ellis Noack won the league’s goalkicking with 55 majors while versatile, Western Suburbs fullback, Ray Sharrock, who played most of the season in a back brace, won the Phelan Medal.

Sharrock was instrumental in his club’s grand final victory over Newtown before a record crowd at Trumper Park.  League secretary, Rhys Giddey gave the attendance as 11,337 but admitted years later that he may well have over liberally over-estimated the figure.

As in many of Sydney’s grand finals, the 1963 version was no exception  It opened sensationally with an all-in brawl after an incident in the ruck snowballed and players from all parts of the field rushed to join in the melee.

Players from both sides stood trading punches until central umpire Mal Lee together with goal and boundary umpires separated them.

Newtown’s Gordon Hancock, in later years a leading figure in the Bankstown Sports club, was reported for striking and Wests John Griffiths was charged with kicking.  Wests won 14.14 (98) to Newtown’s 12.16 (88)  after the Magpies were down by nine points at the final change.

The league cancelled the proposed 15 September two hundred and fifty pound ($500), Premiers v The Rest game and replaced it with a final of the post season knock-out competition between St George and South Sydney.

Not to spoil their poor record, the league again finished the 1963 season again in the red.  This time though it was a much more manageable figure of thirty seven pounds ($74.00)

NO TYPEWRITER IN 1962

Typewriter1962 was a real problem year for football in Sydney.

Ernie McFarlane, the former long term Newtown FC Secretary and player was in his second year as president of the league after accepting the position, that apparently not many wanted.  He was a member of the board of control for several years before this.  McFarlane took over from Wilf Holmes, a shipping executive, who, in his one year as president, was clearly out of his depth in what could only be described as a volatile Sydney football environment.

McFarlane had been a dynamo at Newtown but struggled as president of the league.  Early in the year two board members, Joe Armstrong and Ern Holmes, and later, University coach and league vice president, Frank Bird, resigned their positions.  Then secretary of the junior organisation, the NSW Football Union, Arthur Bridgewater, was suspended from the board following a disagreement.

Ernie McFarlane I
Ern McFarlane

Wilf Holmes - NSW AFL Life Member
Wilf Holmes

Arthur Bridgewater
Arthur Bridgewater

 

Fortunately, principal of a leading accounting firm, Arthur Davey of Sylvania, had taken over as treasurer midway during the previous year but in doing so walked into a financial minefield.  His predecessor had resigned and the fulltime secretary of the league had been suspended.  There had been some allegations of impropriety, while Davey would probably have used the term, ‘incompetence’, particularly when it took almost a month before he could get hold of the books for examination.

Things were so bad that the Australian National Football Council, the then national body for control of the game, withheld payment of their second installment of seven hundred and fifty pounds ($1400) towards the salary of the league’s fulltime secretary until such time that the accounts were audited and all clubs had paid their liabilities.

In that period, unlike today, there was no mechanism in place to compel clubs to pay their accounts to the league.  Then, and in particular, the main areas of liability to the league by clubs included affiliation fees, season tickets for entry to the ground and a levy for the employment of a fulltime secretary.

Davey eventually audited the accounts himself and in doing so found an outstanding contingent liability of five hundred and twenty one pounds ten shillings ($1043.00) owing to the clubs since 1957  This had involved a complicated method of financial reward to clubs based on the Club Championship for that year.  For a number of years around that period, the league concluded their seasons in debt, at times the amounts involved were quite sizable.

So early in 1962 the mood was very gloomy in Sydney football, certainly at a league level.

Some on the board wanted to re-appoint a fulltime secretary while others did not and this in itself caused continual bickering resulting in the resignations and suspension, mentioned above.

Further it was said “The New South Wales League has no funds”.

“We don’t even have a typewriter or an office desk” one board member said.  “The league was formed 59 years ago, but I doubt if we have ever been in worse financial position.”

Despite all this, the league re-introduced Sydney University to the first grade competition along with new club, Parramatta, bringing the number of clubs to twelve.  This was a perfect opportunity to establish a second division, but football would have to wait almost 10 years before this took place.  In the meantime four of the 1962 clubs had either folded or amalgamated.

At the end of the year Davey again showed that he was no shrinking violet and let his feeling be known in a lengthy report to the league where he urged a restructure of the organisation, particularly after it again finished the year in debt.  This time though the amount had been substantially reduced from those of previous seasons.

Rhys Giddey replaced Joe Boulus as honorary secretary between the end of the season and the subsequent annual general meeting which was held in February 1963.  Giddey went on to fill the fulltime league secretary’s role for the next two years.  He described his first 12 months in the job as one that had “been under pressures which, in 60 years, had not previously been experienced.”

This was particularly the case after Boulus had issued three writs against members of the Board of Management following the severance of his association with the league.

Just as the story gets interesting we have to end it here because we we are limited for space.