– Sunday Football – Not All That Easy

Playing football or any sport for that matter on the weekend is just a given these days, but that wasn’t always the case.

The Commonwealth Arbitration Court gave approval of the 40-hour five-day working week nationally beginning on 1 January 1948.

Prior to this most of Australia’s workers laboured on Saturday Morning which in turn impacted on football:
• Games started later on Saturday afternoons. In Sydney, senior matches commenced at 3:00pm while the reserve grade started at 1:30pm, normally with limited quarters and no time on. Rugby League started their games at 3:15pm and Rugby Union 3:20pm.

• The development of junior football was restricted because of the needs of adults to work on Saturday Mornings. In some areas this led to Sunday Morning football. Most, but not all junior football was left to schools. There was however the Metropolitan Australian National Football Association which was like a Second Division in Sydney, supporting at times, grades as low as Under 16s.

• Many senior games in the country were played of a Sunday but in a number of cases this incurred the wrath of the church and many politicians. Some country councils would not allow any sport at all on Sunday so this then restricted the limits of football competitions, particularly in the country, where time would not permit distant travel to an opposition town to play.

When senior sport attempted to play or apply for use of grounds in Sydney on Sunday in the late 1930s they were met with attitudes like this from the Town Clerk (General Manager) of the Randwick Council: “that Sabbatarianism and muddied oafs is a blend that may not be quaffed on grounds under his council’s control.”

But this wasn’t the stance in all parts of NSW. Sunday games had been played on and off in Broken Hill since the early part of the 20th century but it wasn’t until 1939 that a Sunday Football League was established.

In June 1919 the Temora Rugby League Club presented a petition signed by 600 inhabitants of the town requesting that the resolution to ban the use of the Recreation Ground for football on Sundays be lifted. It was not successful so in September of the same year, Temora chose to play Junee on a private piece of land in the town.

By 1920 Rugby League in Junee area was being regularly played of a Sunday,  but perhaps not in all parts of the Riverina.

By December 1936 Bathurst remained the only town in the Central West where Sunday football was not sanctioned however by 1937 ‘the extension of Sunday football in country areas ’had pretty much crept throughout the rugby league community.

The South West District (Australian) Football League in the Riverina was reformed just before WWII and they began to play of a Sunday, which proved exceptionally popular. The league was comprised of clubs moving from other competitions.

With Sydney though it would appear the matter was a very vexed question when the Australian Football body considered playing games on a Sunday in early 1938.

Newtown FC secretary, Les Blackmore said “Sunday football has never been officially discussed by our club and until it comes before my committee, nobody can assert that we are ln favour of the proposal. There might have been some unofficial talks on the subject, and, from what I can gather, opinions are about equally divided. Personally, I am against, the Idea.”

Why did Sydney football administrators consider moving to Sunday?

Ostensibly they said it was because of a lack of three grounds where an entry fee could be charged. So one way or the other, it was all about money.

At the adjourned 1938 annual meeting of the New South Wales Australian National Football League, Mr. J. McKeown, president of the Sydney club, moved a motion that the competition matches should be divided, two games to be played on Saturdays and one game on the Sunday. It was resolved to refer a decision to the individual clubs for an expression of opinion.

Mr. McKeown said that, “for many reasons, Saturday football was not revenue producing, and the trend now was wholly in favour of Sunday football. Owing to the Housing Board having taken charge of Erskineville Park, the approaches were in such a bad state that people would not visit the oval, and if Erskineville Oval could not pay, as it had always done, for the other grounds, the results at the end of the season would not be as good as they had been in the past.”

[Note: This was when the old Erskineville Oval was being demolished and moved to its present location.  The ground in this year was playable but the venue was not attractive.]

Bruce O’Grady, the Sydney Club secretary said “Erskineville Oval gets a big crowd on Saturday, because the best game is staged there. Trumper Park is not as good while Kensington Oval is useless, we are lucky if we get 50 shillings at Kensington but if we can get £50 out of the ‘gate’ on a Sunday at Trumper we will be satisfied.”

In what can only be described as a weak move, instead of making the decision themselves, the N.S.W. Australian National Football League decided to ask the clubs to ascertain the views of players and to report back to the League by April 4, 1938.

At a subsequent meeting of the N.S.W. National Football League the introduction of Sunday football in Sydney was soundly defeated by an overwhelming majority .  Strangely, the decision followed a vote by the players, of whom 73 were against and 29 in favour. The South Sydney Club was the only club to support the scheme. Following this vote, the chairman, Mr. W. H. Fitt, said that “it would have been impossible to carry out the idea, owing the lack of grounds. ”We canvassed all councils for a ground without success.”

By 1943 however it was all different. The League president, Mr N P Joseph announced that “with the admission of an R.A.A.F. team into the competition, (virtually replacing North Shore FC which withdrew during WWII) it would be necessary to play one match each Sunday. A shortage of playing area would not allow of three games being played on Saturday.”  And so we ask, “What changed?”

And boy did it improve the gate takings.

Of course there is more to the story which we shall go into in a later story. Below is the graph of gate takings at Sydney football between 1930-60.

References:
Daily Advertiser, Wagga Wagga
Barrier Miner, Broken Hill
Sydney Morning Herald 16 March 1943 p.7
Sydney Morning Herald, 23 March 1938, p.21
Sun, Sydney, 23 March 1938, p.21
Sun, Sydney, 24 March 1938, p.47
Truth, Sydney, 27 March 1938, p. 7
Cootamundra Herald, 6 April 1938, p.2
NSWANFL 1938 & 1943 Annual Reports

– 1929 And the Football Scene in Sydney

Australian Rules Title1929 Rolled around just like another season in Australian Football in Sydney but there were a few changes and surprises.

St George was admitted to the first grade competition and this was despite two clubs voting against their admission.  The previous year they had participated in the reserve grade and a few years previous also had one or two seasons in the seconds.  Their driving force was their president a Rockdale bank manager, Andrew Glass.

The League secured a six year lease of Erskineville Oval at £500 per annum ($37,628 in today’s money).  In the agreement, £100 had to be spent on improvements each year during that period to the oval.

Because the Rugby Union pushed the bid, the league had to pay £200 for the use of Trumper Park in 1929, and extra £40 more than in the previous year.

A new ground was introduced to the League in Kensington Oval.  This was built over a sandy waste through which a stream led from the ponds in Centennial Park to the Botany Swamps (funny how the name of the water repositories change as the standing of the suburb then was much lower in the pecking order).  The controlling body paid £60 pounds to Randwick Council for its use.  St Lukes Oval, Burwood and North Sydney Oval were two which were also used in the competition that year.

Alexandria Park and Marrickville Oval though, were both lost to Rugby League.

The League continued with the same admission fee to the grounds at one shilling to the outer and one and six pence to the grandstand ($3.76 & $5.64 today).  They also sold season tickets which purchasers could buy at twelve shillings and sixpence ($47.00 today).

Only after one year at the helm, S H Donnelly stood down as League president with the position going to solicitor and WWI veteran, Aub Provan, formerly a player with the Newtown Club.  H Gordon Harris, another Tasmanian, replaced L W Percy as League secretary.

The season was opened with a two team interstate Railways Carnival, South Australia and New South Wales.  Their solitary game was won by the latter.

– 1938 – A Year to Remember
in Sydney Football

1938-st-george-v-south-sydney
St George – in yellow & black, v South Sydney
in 1938

A number of interesting events occurred in 1938.

Because of a good financial season in 1937, the league voted ten pounds ($860.00 in today’s money) to each of the six Sydney clubs before the commencement of the competition.

A Team At Wollongong?
Early in the year, the Metropolitan Aust National Football Association (second division) refused an application by a group from Wollongong to compete in the second division competition citing the lack of a home ground.  The applicants were encouraged to form a local competition rather than enter one team in the Sydney League.  Nothing came of it.

Sunday football was a big talking point in the league and in fact in all codes of football.  For the Australian Game the decided lack of grounds where a gate could be charged was the issue.

Basically there were six first grade clubs and two grounds where the league could control the attendance gate:  Erskineville Oval and Trumper Park.  They wanted an additional ground or alternatively to use one of the Saturday grounds again on a Sunday.

Kensington Oval at Kingsford was the third alternative but only honest people paid so the league was flat out earning fifteen shillings a game.

Traditionalists in the league however soundly defeated the Sunday proposal but it was only a matter of time before Sunday games successfully became part of the league’s calendar.

North Sydney Oval
After a lapse of  ten years, North Shore again played on the small North Sydney Oval,  a ground noted for its particularly hard surface.  There, an estimated crowd of 4,000 witnessed South Sydney defeat North 14-15 to 9-11.  The first semi-final again between North Shore and South Sydney was played there on September 3.

Jubilee Oval, Kogarah
In another first, St George played their first match on Jubilee Oval, Kogarah, now home to St George Rugby League Club on Monday 13 June also before of 4,000 spectators.  Here too a semi-final was played on 3 September ironically between the same teams participated in that initial game:  St George and Newtown.

These were the first occasions, certainly in more recent years, that any finals match was played away from the then league headquarters of Erskineville Oval.

In a very controversial incident at Kensington Oval, central umpire Bill Hunkin reported two players AND the timekeepers in the game between South Sydney and St George on 2 July.

It was alleged that the timekeepers failed to record time-on whilst the umpire attended to a fight and in the meantime rang the bell for full time just as a South Sydney player kicked for goal.  The goal, which would have won the game for Souths was disallowed.

A subsequent hearing found the timekeepers had erred, they had stopped the game 1 minute early, the goal was allowed and the game was awarded to South Sydney.

In the same year South Sydney altered their jumper design from a green jumper with a very wide horizontal bar across the centre to one of green with a red V.

Four time Phelan Medalist, Jack Williamson, registered 100 games for the Eastern Suburbs Club in early May.  He was reported in 1938 for abusive language but must have beat the charge because he won his fourth Phelan in that year.

Police Intervention
In late August a local police inspector pulled the captains of Newtown and South Sydney Clubs, as well as the umpires aside before the commencement of their game at Erskineville Oval warning them against any repeat of the violent play that dominated the last time they met.  He warned them and the umpires that if a repetition of the previous week’s violent play between the two occurred again the police would enter the ground and arrest any offender.  He said “if the league official (umpire) did not intend to stop that sort of play, the police would.”

There were a few occasions when players lost their tempers but no reports.

Interstate
During the latter part of the season NSW were defeated by East Fremantle on the RAS Showground in front of a crowd of 6,000 while the state team performed poorly at the National Amateur Football Carnival in Launceston where they were defeated by South Australia and Victoria.  They managed a win in the last game against Canberra.

An interstate Railways Carnival was played on Erskineville Oval.  NSW, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania competed.  The interstate teams arrived in Sydney by train as did the country representatives in the NSW team.  The carnival was won by Victoria.

– Grounds in Sydney

An aerial image of Kensington Oval in 1943
An aerial image of Kensington Oval in 1943

You would be surprised at the list of different grounds that have been used in Sydney over the years.

Today we are used to say, Picken Oval, Olds Park and maybe Henson Park, but there have been many, many others.

One obscure ground is Kensington Oval which is located in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, between Kensington and Kingsford.  It is not longer used by the code.

It was constructed in 1928 from a sandy area on land which was also part of the catchment for the Botany Swamps which was used for Sydney’s water supply in the 19th century.

The ground came online in 1928 and in 1929 was one secured by the league as a venue for first grade matches at a lease fee of £60 ($4,500 today) per annum.  At the same time the league paid £500 for year for six years for the use of Erskineville Oval with £100 ($7,500) of that money to be used for improvements to the ground.  A challenge by Rugby Union pushed the fee for the use of Trumper Park from £100 in 1928 to £160 ($12,000) in 1929; and these when in the times when admission to the ground was one shilling ($3.75), grandstand one and six ($5.65) or patrons could purchase a season ticket for twelve shillings and sixpence ($47.00).

Chart of Sydney Ground Gate Takings 1930-50
Chart of Sydney Gate Takings 1930-50

Randwick Council built a grandstand for patrons but because the ground was not totally fenced, charging admission was a folly and most wrote off the use of the ground as a financial stream to the league.

South Sydney started training at the ground in 1928, previous to this they had trained at the now built on, Australian Football Ground which was on the corner of Botany and Gardeners Road, Alexandria.  Prior on Moore Park.

During the 1930s depression the out of work players and those on shift work volunteered their time to realign the ground and at the same time lengthen it.  A report from the Sydney Football Record in 1937 said

“There were scenes of great activity at Kensington Oval during the week.  A small army of workmen cut away the high ground outside certain portions of the fence to enable the extension of the playing area to comply with the measurements required by the code.

This, coupled with the fact that the ground has been newly top-dressed and harrowed will make the oval comparable with the best Australian Football Ground in the state.  By 8 May the full playing area will be ready to use.  No more will it be known as the despised ‘marble ring’ as the added length and wide pockets will give ample room to flank men thus opening up possibilities for more brilliant play.

The dimensions of the oval will be 140 yards x 150 yards, five yards less than the Sydney Cricket Ground and the major axis will run parallel to the grandstand, thus affording the spectators a better view.”

The ground fell out of permanent match use when the league introduced Sunday matches which made available Erskineville Oval or Trumper Park to be used on consecutive days over the weekend.

South Sydney initially had use of the top potion of the grandstand as a clubroom however it was soon taken over by the local council to use as a library repository.  Local junior rugby league began to use the ground for weekend matches and in 1974 South Sydney moved to Erskineville Oval as a training venue.

Smart or Dumb?

1949 - Mal Dean ES (No. 13) v North Shore at Henson. George Brack (NS) on right smallerRound 10 in 1937 Sydney football was played on Saturday 19 June and it poured during and prior to the match.  So much so that a number of sports were cancelled.

There were three grounds used by the league then and it was said on the day that (the old) Erskineville Oval, “apart from one or two small patches of water, was in playable order to the half time interval where South Sydney defeated St George.  At Trumper Park, where conditions were pretty bad, North Shore scooted home over Eastern Suburbs while in the remaining match at Kensington Oval (Kingsford), the Sydney and Newtown clubs adopted a very unusual method of determining the winner.

Prior to the commencement of the senior game, representatives from both clubs, via the ground manager, had the phone wires fusing with demands to league officials that the game be abandoned because of  the state of the playing area which was waterlogged.  The ground was flooded with up to 30-40ml of water across the Randwick half of the arena.  Undoubtedly it was, but apparently not to the same extent as Erskineville and Trumper Park, both of which, due to their physical configuration, were much more adversely affected by such weather.

League officials were firm in their ruling that the game must be played and in accordance with the rules. Faced with this decision the clubs concerned put their heads together and evolved a scheme they considered could circumvent the constitution of the league plus profit and minus risk to themselves.

So when the first grade field umpire, Tom King, took the ground, one player from each of the reserve grade sides accompanied him (the reserve grade match was played  with Newtown 6-2 (38) defeating Sydney 3-2 (20).  After each player had kicked two goals and one behind apiece, they solemnly walked off and declared it a day, and the game a draw after five minutes play. Now how each managed to kick the ball into play and who took possession of it following the behind is anybodys’ guess.

This act was in total defiance and disregard of the rule which definitely set out that a game shall consist of four quarters, each of twenty-five minutes duration. If they had been granted the privilege of a draw, it would mean that each defaulting club, and defaulters they undoubtedly were, would gain two points on the premiership table by the adoption of tactics more deserving of censure than commendation. While the clubs that went down In the other games, both by the narrowest of margins, after fulfilling their obligations to the League and the public under conditions that were of the worst, automatically forfeit four points. Could anything, apart from the flouting of the rules, be more farcical?  As regards the games that were played, well, to misquote Kipling, if mud be the price of admiralty, the six dozen soused, sodden and spattered stalwarts who prayed for five o’clock and hot showers may rightfully count themselves admirals all.

Both clubs maintained that the match was a draw and that each were entitled to competition points.  But the league’s administration failed to see it that way.  The rules today though would not allow such a situation to take place.

The Monday Night following the game the league maintained that each club broke all of the laws of the game which said, “games shall be played in wet or fine weather.”

Both were denied any competition points and each were fined two pounds ($175.00 in today’s money).  Also, club officials were severely censured by the league and this was even after the their delegates had argued that the ground was totally unfit for play and the game should be replayed.  It was not.

At the end of the season, two or four points to each club mattered not.  Newtown was in third position on 42 points, eighteen behind St George in second place and Sydney finished in fourth position, on 36 points.

Movement in the Seventies

The development and expansion of NSW football took place mostly in the 1970s really makes you ask why?

The last major addition to Sydney football was in 1948 when Western Suburbs and Balmain re-emerged and Sydney University were formed.

But in the seventies not only did new clubs appear in Sydney, including Manly, St Ives, Sutherland, Blacktown, Mac Uni, Bankstown Sports, Campbelltown, Pennant Hills etc. but new leagues developed on the South Coast, the Illawarra and Central Coast  all spawning new teams.

One reason offered for the expansion of the game was that the baby boomers began moving out to the suburbs and regional areas.

City clubs like Sydney Naval, South Sydney and later Newtown felt that exit and went out of business.  These were inner city clubs that excelled during the first half of the last century but struggled when the youth was no longer there to take over.

The East Sydney Club, formerly Eastern Suburbs, emerged out of an amalgamation of Paddington and East Sydney Clubs in 1926.  They withstood the exodus for most of the century however they began to rely heavily on interstate players and players from out of their area.  They kept a junior division but it struggled to sustain the re-supply of players needed at senior club level.  Eventually they combined with the University of NSW in 2000 to form a new club, UNSW-ES.

This was the first time their officials saw the need to merge whilst Sydney (Naval) on the other hand had combined with the reserve grade Public Service Club in 1923 and not that much later with Balmain in 1926.  On both occasions they stuck with their given name.  They did however toy with the idea of changing the title to Glebe in about 1930, shortly after shifting their home ground to Wentworth Park, but, they maintained the title, Sydney, until 1944 when the naval influence in the club resolved to alter it to Sydney Naval.

Clubs have come and gone;  the present Blacktown club for example is the third to assume that name.

While Newtown faded off to oblivion there did appear to be a whisker of light with the emergence of a new Newtown junior club some years ago. The aging South Sydney faithful may hold out a glimmer of hope that one day the Randwick Saints might work their way to the purpose built Australian football ground at Kensington Oval.  But, like Trumper Park, the grandstand there has been demolished.

Grounds In Sydney’s Major League

Ground imageClubs in Sydney have used many different grounds throughout their history.  As well as the home grounds set out below, there are also many other neutral grounds that clubs have used over the years.

Manly Warringah have used Weldon Oval at Curl Curl for nearly all of their history. The only exception to this was for two years from 2009 to 2010 when Pittwater Oval was used.  During those years, Weldon Oval was being redeveloped, and was out of commission.

Pennant Hills have also had a reasonably stable ground tenancy. Ern Holmes Oval, previously called Pennant Hills Oval No 2, has been used for almost all of its history.  The narrow shape of the ground was the main factor leading to Pennant Hills recent relocation to Mike Kenny Oval at Cherrybrook.

The Western Suburbs Club is another case altogether.  They have used several grounds throughout their history.  In the early years after their formation in 1947/48 Wests firstly played their home games at Henson Park Marrickville.  They then moved to St Lukes Oval, Concord. Matches were also possibly played at the nearby, Concord Oval. In 1957, Wests moved to Picken Oval at Croydon Park.  That was a privately owned ground by Bill Picken, a trotting trainer.  A trotting track surrounded the ground where the horses were used in training.  Wests built their licensed club adjacent to the ground.  Unfortunately, a dispute between the licensed club and a member of Mr Picken’s family led to the club losing the use of the ground.

The then club set about redeveloping a disused brick pit at Ashbury, which was to become W H Wagener Oval.  Many hours of volunteer labour were put into the new ground, but several years were to pass whilst the surface settled after its being filled.  During that period, Wests used Macquarie University Oval for its home games.  The club found that crossing the Parramatta River was just too far for the club’s supporters, and no doubt fewer people ventured back to the licensed club.  so the Club then moved its home games for one season to Outer Jensen Oval at Sefton.  That was the home ground of Bankstown Sports Club (who later moved to Kelso Oval).

At last W H Wagener Oval became West’s ground , although a relatively short distance from Wests Licensed Club it was still a reasonable barrier to patrons returning to the clubrooms.  In more recent years, Picken Oval reverted to Council ownership, and the juniors played their games there.  An upgrade to Picken, including the building of an amenities area, led to Western Suburbs returning to their home at Picken Oval not that long ago.

St George in its earliest years mainly used the grounds arranged by the league including SCG No 2, Erskineville Oval and Trumper Park.  Home games were played occasionally at Kogarah Jubilee Oval.  Hurstville Oval became St George’s home ground for several years, before Olds Park at Mortdale became their home in 1965.  Some matches have been played at Olds Park No 2, but mainly for lower grades.  Redevelopment of Olds Park led St George to also play some games at Bankstown Memorial Oval as well as Kelso Oval, Panania.

Most of Sydney Uni’s games have been played at University Oval No 1.  The adjacent University Oval No 2 has also hosted games.  Recently several games have also been played at St Paul’s Oval which is also on the University campus with then entry off City Road.

Both of the founding clubs of University of NSW- East Sydney have had several home grounds.  For this discussion, Eastern Suburbs for most of their existence played at Trumper Park, Paddington.  Easts also played some home games in the 1950s at Waverley Oval, Bondi and slightly earlier at The Sydney Sports Ground.  The Sports Ground no longer exists, but it was in Driver Avenue, Moore Park, next to the also demolished, SCG No 2.  This was basically where the SCG car park is today.

University of NSW originally played on neutral grounds such as Trumper Park and Erskineville Oval.  In the late 1970s they used the Little Bay Sports Complex, part of the Uni of NSW Sports Fields. The land was later sold off and used for housing.  The facilities at Little Bay were quite good, but the ground was often subject to strong winds, being very close to the coast.  Uni of NSW moved to the Village Green at the main campus at Kensington.  Village Green is the home ground of the new unified club.

North Sydney Oval was, for a long period, used as North Shore’s ground. Chatswood Oval was also used in the 1930s.

The church across the road from North Sydney Oval in Miller Street used to object to the sounds of the whistle, and the bell or siren to mark the quarter start or endings, whilst their services were conducted on Sunday Mornings.  This forced their Under 19s games during the 1960s and 1970s to be played at the desolate, Gore Hill Oval, whilst Reserve and First Grade were played at North Sydney Oval No 1.

The ground was really too small for Australian Football and costs became prohibitive when the council redeveloped the ground building extensive and historic grandstands.  North Shore then relocated to Gore Hill Oval at St Leonards.  During their relocation era, a number of home games were also played at Macquarie University Oval.

UTS, despite being the most recently formed club participating in Premier League, have already played at two different home grounds.  Trumper Park was no longer used for senior football when East Sydney merged with Uni of NSW, so UTS secured the long term AFL ground.  UTS adopted the Bats emblem from the fruit bats that occupy the large trees surrounding Trumper Oval. More recently, Waverley Oval, with its newly constructed grandstand is now shared with Trumper Oval for UTS home games.

When the Campbelltown club first entered the senior competition in Sydney in the mid 1970s, they played at the Ingleburn Army Base ground. Then they relocated to Memorial Oval, Ingleburn.  Upon their promotion to what is now Premier League they moved to Macquarie Fields Oval, originally called Edelsten Oval after Dr Geoffrey Edelsten.  The ground has since had several name changes.

1940 NSWAFL President’s Address

N P Joseph President NSWANFL smallWe have located an interesting article written by the president of the NSW Australian Nation Football League, Mr Norman P Joseph.  The second World War was only a matter of months old and he wrote the following for the Anzac Day issue of the Football Record:

“With the opening of the 1940 season, I would like to take advantage of the courtesy of the Editor of the ‘Record’ in extending a hearty welcome to all followers of the National Code.

It is unfortunate that the season should be ushered in, in the midst of war, but it is the League’s intention to carry on as usual, according to the Government’s idea, that sport, as well as business, is essential to Australia’s daily life.  We have, therefore, made preparations for a full season’s programme;  but, if at any time the Government thinks that some restrictions should be put on sport, I feel sure the members of my league will unanimously agree to fall into line with any plans that will assist the Government in its great effort to help the Empire win the War.

Our main activity will, of course, be our Premiership Competition.  This will be carried on in the usual way and the only variation will be in the matter of grounds.  The League has another term for the use of Trumper Park and Kensington (Oval), in addition we have secured dates at Kogarah Oval and probably Sydney Cricket Ground, No. 2.

As regards Erskineville, patrons are fully aware that the old ground has been demolished by the Housing Improvements Board and in its place1988 Erskineville Oval 001 small has been built what will eventually be one of the finest suburban grounds in Australia.  The League has already installed there and we hope that when the new grandstand is built that we will attract a great number of people who hitherto have never come out to this ground.  If they do, we feel sure they will be most agreeably surprised at the elaborate plan on which this new ground has been built, and also the size of the playing field, which is probably one of, if no the largest, in the Metropolitan area.

The standard of our clubs should again show further improvement, as despite the fact that we have lost some of our players through enlistment, there has been quite an influx of talent from other states, and these together with some of our very promising juniors should lift up the standard considerably.

There are prospects of visits by teams from South Australia, Western Australia and possibly Victoria this year and the League will do its utmost to stage as many interstate matches as we can reasonably manage, and patrons may look forward to seeing one or more of the big Southern Clubs in action.

It would now seem that the National Code is established beyond all doubt in New South Wales, particularly in Sydney and with the steady progress that has been made the last few years if should not be long before our game is one of, if not the major winter sport.

We shall be very pleased and hope to renew acquaintances with our old supporters together with many new ones, and hope that they will all thoroughly enjoy a very interesting and prosperous season of the great winter sport – Australian National Football.”