– Football On The Domain

More than likely, the majority of those reading this will have no idea where ‘the Domain’ is in Sydney.

In 1816 Governor Macquarie inaugurated what are now the Royal Botanic Gardens and the ‘Domain’, on land that his predecessor, Arthur Phillip had set aside as a ‘Governor’s demesne’ [a piece of land attached to a manor and retained by the owner for their own use] late in the eighteenth century.

It is situated to the south of the Opera House and behind the NSW Parliament Building.  The land is home to the NSW Art Gallery and also Mrs Macquarie’s Chair.

The subsequent growth of Sydney’s magnificent Botanic Gardens was at the expense of the Domain. The Domain now exists only in four small precincts, where once it covered all the area from Woolloomooloo Bay to Circular Quay, and south to Hyde Park. Encroachments over time – such as in 1942, when Domain land was taken for naval fuel tanks, and during the 1960s when land was taken for ramps for freeways and traffic tunnels – have greatly diminished its original size.

The venue was also used for political orators of a Sunday who used to gather people in their thousands to listen to these various soap box speakers.  Sadly this part of Sydney’s history is gone.

However at lunch time, midweek, a few sports are still played there, in particular soccer and touch football while netball courts are located on top of the Domain carpark.  The park was also the scene of a midweek city business houses rugby league competition in the fifties, sixties and seventies.

People could be seen hurrying from their city offices the short distance to the Domain to watch or play sport their during their luncheon period.

Clinton Wines

On Wednesday 27 August 1947 a lunch-hour game of Australian Football was played before a crowd of 500 people at the Sydney Domain.  Eastern Suburbs player and former Carlton star, Clinton Wines, was instrumental in having the game played.  The teams were made up of a number of Sydney first grade player including test cricketer, Keith Miller who then played with the Sydney Club.

Although reports on the game (we think there was only one), are scant we can provide some detail on the leadup to the match:

Test cricketer Keith Miller, and NSW captain Roy Hayes lead the two teams in what was described as a lunch-hour promotional match.

Nine State players and other outstanding first-graders took part. Many of the players worked in the city, but others travelled from distant suburbs to participate.

Besides Wines, Newtown captain Alan Smythe along with Ron Matthews, policeman Neil Stevens, Roy Geddes, Ted Larsen and Darcy Coleman were all involved.  It was reported “that many spectators, who have never seen the code, would get an idea just how spectacular it is,” said Hayes, the captain and coach of the Eastern Suburbs Club.

“The Australian Council is spending money on fostering the code in NSW and Queensland, but there Is no better way of making progress than ‘to bring the game before the public. “Hundreds of people walk in the Domain and Gardens In the lunch-hour, and we want them to see the match.” he added.

Roy Hayes

The game was played in two 25 minutes halves.  Many of the players had to dash from their city offices at 1:00pm then be back at their work place by 2:00pm.

Jack Dean, (now deceased) a former member of the History Society Committee played in the game and said it was very popular amongst the lunchtime crowd.  Dean, a plumber, had to organise himself to be ready to go at 1:00pm and then back to his work in the Eastern Sububs of Sydney.

We have no record if other matches were played or the actual result of the game but were told that further games were planned for 1948.  They did not go ahead.

The concept of Lunchtime AFL at the Domain could well be taken up by present day administrators of the game in Sydney who might want to schedule an AFL 9s game or a modified Womens AFL match on this popular Sydney lunchtime venue.

A LOOK BACK TO 1987

My beautiful pictureAlmost 30 years ago now, yet another new regime took hold of NSW football.

Only a few years prior to this, a new broom under president, Bernie Heafey, in a coup, swept aside the congenial governance of Bill Hart, which, for the most part, had followed the operational football pattern based on that set when the game was resuscitated in Sydney in 1903.

The VFL supported Heafey management lasted no more than half a dozen years following the bluff and bluster of their introduction.  In fact it sent a very divided Sydney and NSW football administration almost broke.  In late 1986 the NSWAFL auditors advised that the league would be declared bankrupt.

By this time a new regime which followed and was linked to the private ownership of the Sydney Swans, and had, as part of their licence, to guarantee $417,000 per year for development of the game in NSW, had taken root.  But in all the manoeuvrings, conivings and plottings which in the end produced poor management as opposed the good and benefit of football, had made its mark.

Players and officials from clubs and country leagues knew little of of the problems and issues of the inner sanctum of NSW/Sydney Football.  Their main concern was their little patch and so long as the game went ahead on the weekend, these issues were of little concern.

By mid 1986 the turmoil faltered to an administrative staff of two: the aging former St George official, Bob McConnell whose role was to deal with player clearances together with the office typist, who both conducted the day to day activities of the league.

Queanbeyan FC guru, Ron Fowlie had resigned his job as CEO of the NSW Football League to return to his club while the machinations of the Sydney competition itself started to show signs of self destruction.

NSWAFL was under the direction of the affable and relatively young, Rod Gillett (pictured), who had made a name for himself working at a number of university student unions throughout the state.  The vital asset Gillett had over his four man committee of Pritchard, Smith and Thomas was his commitment and passion for the game and in particular NSW football.  Fortunately, and in probability with some bias, they made the very important appointment of Ian Granland to the role of CEO of the league.

Important because Granland was a local, he had been a club secretary in Sydney and had an extensive involvement at club and league level.  He understood Sydney football and his heart beat for football.  He knew and understood the problems, the issues and the politics.

Bob Pritchard, who gained his notoriety with Powerplay in the Edelsten years at the Sydney Swans, called a meeting of Sydney Club presidents at the Western Suburbs Licensed Club premises in late 1986.  He laid the options on the table, which included a commission to run the league.  Either relinquish ‘power’ to his group and continue as a viable league or go under.  He also sold the blueprint of a state wide league to operate in NSW which would incorporate some but not all Sydney clubs.  Incidentally this never came to fruition although a similar competition was later tried.

At the same time, Pritchard had arranged for cricket legend, Keith Miller, a former St Kilda, Victoria and NSW player to take on the position of Chief Commissioner ( president) of the NSWAFL.  Miller was reluctant but had Gillett as his accomplished offsider.

The clubs acquiesced.  Authority was once again vested in the NSW Australian Football League.  Change was swift.  The NSW Junior Football Union, which had acquired some dominance over junior football in the state, most particularly because of their influence in the selection and promotion of junior state teams, was abolished.

Next to go was the NSW Country Australian Football Leauge, of which Granland had been a leading advocate. Ironically, it was he who wielded the axe.

The roles of both these organisations was then vested in the NSW Football League, of which, Sydney became one and not a dominant partner. Many of the positions undertaken by volunteers were assumed by paid administrators and the coaching of young state representative teams was in time, assigned to professional football people.

Then there were changes to Sydney football.  Make no mistake, the league was broke.  They had creditors of $50,000 and debtors of $30,000. The competition was split into three divisions, affiliation fees were substantially increased, an individual player registration fee was introduced and those clubs that were in debt to the league were told to pay up or go and play somewhere else.  All but one paid.  The plan was to make the three divisions pay their way, instead of relying on the major clubs to contribute the lions’ share.

There were other subtle changes  The accounts were split, the major one concerning the $417,000 was isolated and the Sydney development officers, all of whom were Sydney Swans players, had their job descriptions better defined to be capably overseen under manager, Greg Harris and later Craig Davis.

Despite some heartache and fractured egos, the foundations were well and truly laid for a revised and viable NSW Australian Football League until the October 1987 world stock market crash bit into the private ownership of the Sydney Swans, effecting the cash flow of the annual $417,000 development money.

My beautiful picture Bob Pritchard 2 My beautiful picture My beautiful picture My beautiful picture My beautiful picture
Keith Miller Bob Pritchard Ian Granland Ron Thomas Greg Harris Bob McConnell
My beautiful picture My beautiful picture My beautiful picture My beautiful picture My beautiful picture My beautiful picture
1987 Sydney Swans Development Officers
Brett Scott Craig Davis Dennis Carroll Mark Browning Paul Hawke Stevie Wright

Gillett Takes On New Post

1988 Rod Gillett @ Bankstown Sports Flag Presentation 2 smallFormer NSW Australian Football League president, Doctor Rodney Gillett, who now leads and manages the English Language Programs at RMIT University, Vietnam, has accepted the honorary post of editor for the Society’s journal.

Gillett has had a passionate involvement in NSW football since he moved from the leafy Victorian town of Kyabram in the mid 1970s..

He initially studied at the University of New England and later took a post at Wagga’s Charles Sturt University where his involvement led him to write an in depth paper on the early history on Australian Football in the Riverina.

More recently he has found himself  working in the education field in Korea, Fiji, and the United Arab Emirates in both the higher education and secondary education sectors.  Dr Gillett holds a Doctorate in Education from Edith Cowan University, a Masters of Applied Linguistics from the University of Southern Queensland, a Masters in Letters, a Bachelor of Arts, and a Diploma of Education from the University of New England, as well as specialist ESL teaching qualifications.

Society officials are pleased that Dr Gillett has accepted the post full well knowing his love of the game and interest in football history.

He was president of the NSW Football League in a rocky period including 1986 and the following year offsided to cricket legend, Keith Miller who took over the chair.

Dr Gillett is no stranger to the History Society.  For many years he was a member of the then Australian Football History Committee which was formed in the 1990s and served as a precursor to the current incorporated History Society.  He continues his football literary skills having several articles published in the popular online football magazine, The Footy Almanac.

His responsibilities with the journal,  include the selection of stories, editing and formatting.

The publication was first produced last year and circulated to members only of the Society.  It proved quite popular and provoked a number of positive responses to its release.

Image shows Dr Gillett presenting the 1987 Under 20s premiership flag to Bankstown Sports Club officials.

JACK DEAN ‘PRINCE OF PLAYERS’ IN SYDNEY FOOTBALL

Jack-Dean3-207x300In the 1949 interstate match between NSW and Victoria at the SCG nineteen year old East Sydney ruckman Jack Dean went up against veteran Victorian captain Jack Dyer at the opening bounce.

“He sat me on my arse!” Jack told me over a few beers. We were at Harry McAsey’s pub in Alexandra after a tribute lunch for our late mate and fellow NSW Football History committee member Ted Ray a few years ago. I put the tape on to record our conversation which was considerably enhanced by the consumption of schooners of Reschs.

“The Vics. cleaned us up that day, but it was a great thrill to play against them” recalled Jack. “We thought we were a chance, our coach Frank Dixon (later a Deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney) was a great motivator and we trained for weeks in advance with a view to beating them”.

Victoria were ‘too polished’ according to Keith Miller’s report in The Daily Mirror. Yes, that’s right, the great Australian cricket all-rounder who had recently retired from football had taken up a new career as a journalist. Miller had represented NSW at the ANFC interstate carnival in 1947 after moving to Sydney to play cricket for NSW after the Second World War.

In addition to the grizzly old Tiger, Jack Dyer, other famous names in the Victorian team for that match were Bob Davis, Bobby Rose, Les Foote, Don Cordner and Bert Clay, who if state-of-origin rules were in place would have been wearing a sky blue guernsey. Clay was recruited to Fitzroy from Henty in southern NSW.

Jack Dean played 25 times for NSW in interstate matches and was voted the Blues best player at the 1958 centenary carnival in Melbourne in 1958. He must have been unlucky not to have been selected in the All-Australian team.

Born and bred in Paddington, Jack went down to Trumper Park with his brother Mal in 1944 and thus began a distinguished football career that took in almost 400 games until he retired in 1966.

His father Joe had played for East Sydney and Jack’s son Marshall also played for Easts. A handy rover, ‘Marsh’ is a raconteur who in tandem with Stephen ‘Bomber’ McClure (brother of Mark ‘Sellers’ McClure) provided their team-mates with many hilarious moments at their favourite pub in Paddington, the Grand National.

Jack was a star performer in the Easts teams that won a staggering six premierships in a row from 1952-59 firstly under captain-coach, Fred Pemberton, then Alf Penno with the last under club legend Roy Hayes. Following his stand-out performance at the 1958 carnival Jack took up an offer to coach Ardlethan in the South-West League in southern NSW.

“I was the only non-ex VFL player coaching in the league.”  ‘The Heap’ (former South Melbourne captain Ian Gillett) was coaching Coolamon, ex North Melbourne star Gerald Eastmure was in charge at Leeton, Footscray’s Brownlow medalist Peter Box was coaching Grongy (Grong Grong Matong), and Don Keyter (ex South Melbourne) was at Griffith. “It was a strong league”, recalled Jack.

“We struggled to match it with the clubs from the bigger places, but we always took it up to them. We had lots of good times afterwards particularly at the London (Ardlethan’s only pub). After 6 o’clock the publican would pull down the blinds and we’d have a great sing-along around the piano. The other clubs used to love to stay back after a game at Ardlethan”

“We made lots of good friends down there and still in contact with them”, but Joy (Jack’s wife) was a city girl and was pretty keen to return to Sydney to be near family, so we came back.”

Jack returned to his old club, East Sydney for the 1961 season. But the next season Jack was enticed to join local rivals Sydney Naval that shared Trumper Park with Easts, but trained down at Rushcutters Bay.

“I’d formed a close friendship with (rover) Danny Wilson through playing together in state teams. Plus, of course, there was a bob in it for me. They were a well run club at this stage and were well supported by some of Sydney’s biggest bookmakers who fielded at the races on Saturdays and came to the Aussie Rules on Sundays.”

Sydney Naval beat Newtown for the 1962 premiership in Sydney of which Jack was part. He played out his career with Sydney Naval until he retired in 1966.

Following this, Jack then turned his hand to administration and after joining the East Sydney committee became club president from 1970 till 1982.  He presided over another golden period for the Bulldogs during which they won six premierships. The most satisfying was for the club’s centenary year, 1980, when under Austin Robertson they thrashed North Shore in the grand final at the Sydney Showgrounds by 121 points.

“After going through the previous season undefeated we got beaten in both finals, which was terribly disappointing. We got ‘Oscar’ to take over from Alex Ruscuklic. We had assembled a very good team with players like Wayne Goss, Ian Allen, Grant Luhrs and Jim Richardson, plus we had retained Peter Ruscuklic as full-forward.”

Ruscuklic was a prolific goal kicker for Easts booting huge tallies of 136 (1979), 156 (1980), and 213 (1981).

A big let-down was expected the next season after the centenary triumph, but Jack had the inspiration to appoint local player Greg ‘Huey’ Harris, who had returned to footy from rugby union in 1979 and missed the premiership season with a knee injury.

Harris master-minded one of the great comebacks in Sydney footy history by leading the Bulldogs to a 89 point win over Sam Kekovich’s Newtown in the 1981 grand final. Easts had been down by 90 points at ¾ time in the second semi but came back to lose by only 10 points.

“Greg was a natural leader. He possesses great people skills, he can lead men. I had become a good friend of his father Col, who I played against when he coached St George. I just knew he would make a successful coach”

“Huey’ sure did he led East Sydney to premierships in 1981, 1982 and 1983 moulding a bunch of eccentric characters and ace footballers into an almost unbeatable combination. Easts won another premiership for good measure in 1984 under Wayne Goss“ Jack Dean was chairman of selectors.

Jack was a selector for many years for State teams and was Alan Jean’s trusted chairman of selectors when Jeans coached NSW in the Escort Cup in 1979-80 when the Blues almost upset the highly fancied Fitzroy (remember the ‘fat full forward for NSW’ Laurie Pendrick kicking 7 goals on then Victorian full-back Harvey Merrigan?) and Richmond in its premiership season.

Jack would go out to the airport in his plumbing truck and pick up Jeans for training. “He is a terrific fellow (Alan Jeans), a great football brain, but more importantly he had the ability to pass it on” according to Jack.

He continued on as chairman of selectors under Sam Kekovich and later, Greg Harris. It was in this period that I got to know Jack as I was the Country team manager for the state squad. Sam and Jack would fly down to Wagga on weekends to conduct training. Following a brisk, light training run we would head off with fellow selectors local legend Greg Leitch and former Essendon star Bobby Greenwood (who would drive over from Griffith in his Pontiac Parisienne) for a long lunch to discuss team selections.

In those days most people in Wagga stayed at home for a roast on Sundays so I used to get a Chinese restaurant to open up especially for us. Sam would always order up big, then feign that he’d forgotten his credit card and ask Jack if he could pay for the meal and claim it back from the league. Jack would always pay and never make a claim.

These days Jack is highly involved in the NSW Footy History Committee and he heads up the committee that selects the members for the local Hall of Fame each year.

Jack was the first player elected to the NSW Hall of Fame in 2003. The Eastern Suburbs-UNSW best and fairest trophy is also named in his honour. He is also a life member of the club.

This year Jack has been nominated for the AFL’s Hall of Fame. In recent years players and officials from the other states have been justly honoured but there is yet to be a non VFL/AFL player from NSW elected. Unlike the other nomination from North Melbourne via North Wagga, there are no issues about character. Jack Dean is True Blue.

Story by Rod Gillett – former Commissioner NSWAFL and former History Society Committee person.

TRUMPER PARK – why it is Australian Football’s prime piece of real estate in Sydney

Submitted by Miles Wilks author of Australian Football Clubs in NSW

Trumper Park can lay claim to being the most enduring and important Australian football oval in Sydney. Whilst the SCG has only been consistently used for football in the last thirty years,

Trumper Park has been used as a football oval for approximately 110 years. Other inner-city football grounds, such as Erskineville Oval, Kensington Oval and Drummoyne Oval, have all seen their time, come and go, yet Paddington’s Trumper Park has endured. Trumper Park Oval is the one constant for a sport that has struggled to have continuity and hold its place in the crowded Sydney
marketplace.

For many, Erskineville Oval is the only oval that could rival Trumper in Sydney as a long-term venue for the game. I can remember as a youngster seeing a grand final match in the early 1980s and it was full of life, yet now when you go there it seems as if all traces of previous football action has been erased.

Football ovals have a soul to them, a life, when they are in use, but empty ovals that are past their use-by date have a melancholy quality about them. And this is the case with the former Newtown FC home ground of Erskineville Oval.

The game ceased to be played there in the early 1990s, and today one would never know that the oval was once the home of a proud football club, the Newtown Angels. There is not a skerrick of evidence (not even a plaque on the grandstand) that confirms that Australian football was once played there.

In contrast, Trumper Park has endured and it is the only Australian football ground in Sydney that has been used more or less continuously for more than 100 years.

The first documented match I could find reference to occurred in 1903, and there is perhaps some chance that football was even played there prior to this date. Colossal figures in Australian history have links to Trumper Park, including the cricketer and sporting hero Keith Miller and the Prime Minister and war leader John Curtin was a visitor to the ground. On top of this, footballers of exceptional quality have played at Trumper including the AFL legend Jack Dyer, as well as the Brownlow medalists Bill Morris and Kevin Murray amongst many other star players.

KEITH MILLER- cricketer.
Undoubtedly one of Australia’s greatest sportsmen and a hero to many, Keith Miller is someone whose life is linked to Trumper Park.  Yet before his link to Trumper is discussed, one should know more about the Keith Miller story and why he is an important figure in Australian history.

Whilst our most iconic Australian cricketer Don Bradman was described as a “clean-skin”, Keith Miller was described by some at the opposite side of the spectrum “a rogue, a big drinker, a womaniser.” There were even persistent and “unsubstantiated rumours of an affair with a member of royalty.”

Don Bradman and Keith Miller had an ongoing battle over the years due to their clash of personalities and different lifestyles and this conflect had some role in Miller not being selected as the Australian team captain towards the end of his career.  This though should not override the fact that Keith Miller was a hero to many.

The iconic figure in Australian football, Ron Barassi, was one of the many who considered Keith Miller as a hero.

The Great Keith Miller- Ron Barassi’s hero
Ron Barassi stated:

“When I was a teenager, I began to idolise one special Australian sportsman. As far as I was concerned, he stood for everything that was important in playing sport. He was dashing. He was cavalier. He was handsome. And he could do anything.

“Apart from his marvellous cricketing skills, I was fully aware of his background as a footballer, and a war hero as a fighter pilot, his war exploits being by far the most intriguing to me.

“He was the hero of the common man. Above all else, Keith Miller taught me the importance of being your own man.”

It wasn’t just Australians who idolised Miller, even the English saw Miller as the hero of the common man. Michael Parkinson, the celebrated English journalist who had his own tv chat show for over two decades, stated:

“I mean here was this man who played cricket, hit big sixes, looked like Errol Flynn, broad-shouldered, dark hair, blue eyes, the ladies loved him, every man wanted to be him.”

MILLER – THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE PILOT in WWII.
Of all the quotes attributed to Miller, the one that has received the most recognition is his comment about his time as a fighter pilot flying against the Germans and their Messerchmitt planes in WWII. A few years after flying in fighter squadrons in England, Miller was asked about the pressure of playing cricket at the top level. He replied: “Pressure, mate. In cricket? You’ve got to be kidding. Pressure is turning around and seeing a Messerschmitt flying up your arse.”

Keith ‘Nugget’ Miller also had a target on his back when he settled in Sydney after the war and played football for the Sydney Naval football club, which had its home ground at Trumper Park.

Any high profile player in the Sydney league was a target, and Miller was a public figure who had represented Australia in cricket and was an ex-VFL player as well.  As a sportsman, one couldn’t get more high profile than that.

The newspaper reports from the time verified that Miller was the target for footballers who played the man and not the ball. A July 1947 report from the Sydney Morning Herald stated, “While on the umpire’s blind side a Newtown player picked up Miller from behind and dumped him heavily. Miller received undue attention from a few Newtown players until the final bell.” Suffice to say that Miller’s football career in Sydney was short-lived – one season, as he was then in his thirties and perhaps not prepared for the lawless nature of football in Sydney, but in later years he was a representative on various committees who had the aim of improving the standing of the game in Sydney.

John Curtin
For some, just mentioning the topic of politicians is enough to put them to sleep, yet every so often there are great politicians who do make a difference and this is the case with John Curtin – Australia’s leader during much of World War II.

His most important moment in history came about in February 1942 when he refused Churchill’s request to divert  Australian troops to Burma so as to shore up the collapsing British front in that region. The British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, was furious that Curtin disobeyed him, but Curtin wanted those troops to defend Australia, and not Burma.

The early months of 1942, when the Japanese were bombing northern Australia and seemed likely to invade the continent, were the darkest hours of the war for Australia – and Britain certainly could not help.  Those troops were eventually used on the Kokoda Trail and were vital in the protection of Australia against the Japanese forces.

John Curtin, our wartime leader, was also a passionate supporter of Australian football, and was a regular visitor of matches held at Trumper during the war. In 1943, he was reported to have gone into the rooms after 0ne game to speak to both teams. Curtin’s sad passing towards the end of the war is also linked to Trumper Park as the newspaper report of the Sydney Morning Herald on the 9th of July, 1945 mentions. It states:

Six thousand people stood in silence yesterday at Trumper Park in memory of the late Mr Curtin. The ceremony arranged by the NSW Australian National Football League, of which Mr Curtin was patron, was held before the first grade Australian Rules game at Trumper.

“The Minister for Transport, Mr O’Sullivan said: “We pay our simple homage to a great sportsman and the man that did so much to keep this country free. The president of the League, Mr Norman Joseph, replied that Mr Curtin was one of the game’s greatest supporters.”

The future:
There is no doubt that the history to the ground is immense, but what of the future? The present football playing tenants of the oval, the UTS Bats FC, have been told to move some of their home matches to Waverley Oval by the Sydney AFL.  The future of the oval is in jeopardy as the Sydney AFL consider the ground too short. This transference of matches has occurred despite the fact that Trumper isn’t as short as two grounds that are still in full-time use in the league: the University of NSW’s Village Green and Sydney University’s home ground.

There is a legacy there. Australian cultural heroes, such as John Curtin and Keith Miller, have graced the ground and have an ongoing link to the ground. It would be a shame to let that heritage go by the wayside just for bureaucratic reasons. Perhaps in the years ahead the ground will be lengthened and another 100 years of football history will be added to what has gone before.

Note: In the second part to this article on Trumper Park I will look at some of the legends of the game who have played at the ground.

JOHN HARDY – THE DYNAMO

In 1950 a 1.76m, 66kg industrial chemist moved from Melbourne to Sydney through his employment.

He was John Hardy, the 22 year old son of Charlie Hardy, a veteran of 250 VFL games with North Melbourne and Essendon, including two premierships.

Charlie, who was shorter and lighter than his son went on to coach at Essendon then St Kilda.

However our subject, John Hardy, played with Calton but, apparently because of his size, could only managed four games nevertheless his efforts saw him win the seconds B & F for the club in 1949.

The young Hardy earned the nickname, Mighty Mouse, and in 1950, the Cricket Immortal, Keith Miller, who himself had  represented the VFL and later he played with Sydney Naval then incidentally, many years after, took on the role of Chief Commissioner of the NSWAFL, wrote an article about John in the Sydney Sporting Life.

We have attached this very descriptive piece about John, the 1951 Phelan Medal winner playing with North Shore, in two parts.  It is very interesting reading.  Click the magnifying glass over the page after opening each link.

John later coached North Shore and was then elected president where he also reported on ABC TV for the game locally.  In his time he was a well known personality in Sydney football but is most recognized as the driving force in the formation of the North Shore-Warringah Junior Football Association in 1969.

The photo shows John in an older style North Shore jumper.

John Hardy Part I

John Hardy Part II