Pleasant Christmas Function

A number of members took advantage of attending the Society’s Christmas party at the Magpie Sports Club yesterday.  They were joined by Simon Wilson and Jonathan Drennan from AFLNSWACT.

One of the attendees was former umpire, Jim McSweeney who at 84 officiated in his final match this year in a Masters Carnival.  There were several other former umpires at the function including Chris Huon and Bill Allen.

A number of other members gave their apologies however they missed a great function where the atmosphere was keen and a number of old football stories were told.

Members will be pleased to know that this year’s journal, Time On, is currently being prepared and will be posted out prior to Christmas.  The issue includes many interesting stories of former happenings in the sport over the past 130 or so seasons and is a great read.

 

– Jim Knocks Himself Out

Society member, Jim McSweeney had a bit of bad luck when umpiring a game at Trumper Park between Eastern Suburbs and South Sydney in 1960.

During the third quarter, Jim knocked himself out after a ball-up in play.  He bounced the ball then ran into it as the ruckmen attempted to punch the ball.

He fell to the ground and lay there unconscious while play continued after which the game was held up for about five minutes while St Johns Ambulancemen attended to him.  He was not especially hurt and continued on with the game.

It certainly was a firey encounter.

  • Players and spectators threw punches as the match ended;
  • One of the punches struck the boundary umpire;
  • Club officials were forced to call in police while a number of people demonstrated outside the umpires’  room after the match.
  • The League president, Wilf Holmes, warned one spectator to leave the ground and told him his admittance would be refused at future games.

McSweeney reported three players for fighting during the match he also reported a reserve grade player for abusing him after the game.

When the match finished a number of spectators rushed at the umpire attempting to strike him, one punch hitting boundary umpire, Ray McMullen.

There was a a fair bit of both on and off-field violence following WWII right up to the seventies.  Thankfully, such is not the case today.

Image shows Jim McSweeney in 1969.  He is the shortest one in the centre of the photograph.

– Committee Re-elected

A reasonable turnout at Magpie Sports yesterday saw those on the committee who stood for election, re-appointed to their positions.

The include:

  • President                      –       Ian Granland
  • Vice President             –       Paul Macpherson
  • Secretary                      –        Heather White
  • Treasurer                      –        John Addison
  • Committee Persons –        Jenny Hancock, Tom Mahon, Ian Wright & Gus McKernan

A comprehensive annual report was tabled and the president moved through the document explaining its contents.  He also commended the members of the committee for their commitment and contribution over the past 12 months.  He also said that while four persons stood as Committee there was provision for the addition of an extra person with whom he had discussions with in recent weeks.

Following the meeting a Special General Meeting was held to approve the changes to the constitution.  These now bring the organisation in line with the updated requirements of the Incorporated Associations Act and the rules and guidelines set by the Department of Fair Trading.  A copy of this had been posted on this website.

After the formalities, attendees were invited to inspect the facilities in the Society’s room at Magpie Sports.  This is where a photograph was taken of some and include from left: Mark Spooner, Tom Mahon (standing),  Ian Allan (son of Bill),  Ian Granland, Bill Allan, Jim McSweeney, Ian Wright.

Old Umpires Never Die

2015 McSweeney, Macpherson, Huon thumbnailHow does the saying go?  “Old umpires never die, they simply lose their whistle.”

Such was the case today when these two former Sydney umpires paid a surprise visit to the Society’s rooms at the Western Suburbs Aussie Rules Club, Croydon Park.

On the left in the pic is Jim McSweeney who did his first umpiring job in the mid 1950s;  He is now 81.  And on the right is Chris Huon, the man we described forever a bridesmaid, never a bride, meaning that he got second place in at least three umpiring appointments in Sydney during his career.

He told the story today that in the days of the single umpire in the late 1960s, two would be appointed to the grand final.  Both would dress and ready themselves for the game.  Then, the chairman of the Umpires’ Appointment Board would come into the umpires room at Trumper Park and announce who was to control the game.  Chris always got second place and the position of reserve umpire, on the bench.

Nevertheless the two assumed a number of roles in their time on the committee of the Umpires’ Association, from president through to treasurer.

The two still umpire today, this time they officiate in the Masters Football Competition in Sydney.

Chris brought with him a number of items he donated to the Society which were precious to him during his time with the whistle.  They include rule books, appointment sheets, notes on umpiring, meeting minutes etc.  The Society will scan then house these objects in their collection at Croydon Park.

While Jim had with him a photo of the umpires who officiated in the 1969 Under 19 Grand Final.  From left: Graeme 1969 U19 Grand Final Umpires thumbnailWhykes, Ken Smith, Leo Magee, Jim McSweeney, Peter Ryder, Bert Odewahn, Pat McMahon, Bob Tait.  Here again, Jim was the ‘reserve’ umpire.

The man in the middle of these two old umpires at top is Paul Macpherson, Vice President of the History Society and himself a former umpire in the Diamond Valley League, Melbourne.

Mal Lee

1967 Sydney Grand Final UmpiresA chance mention by school teacher, Paul McSweeney, about Australian football and umpiring led to one of his young students, Rachel, to mention that her Pop was an umpire.

“What is his name”asked Paul, son of NSW Umpires’ Association Life Member, Jim McSweeney.

“Malcolm”was the timid reply.

“Malcolm?” then after a slight pause, “Not Mal Lee” Paul questioned.  “Yes, thats him.”

Paul told his father which led to a gathering of 1960s Sydney umpires at the Carringbah home of Mal Lee’s son just before Christmas 2014.

Mal Lee was known to many in Sydney football circles during the 1960s and early 70s.

He came to Sydney from Yarraville in the late 1950s and because he lived at Rosebery, turned out with the South Sydney Club.  However the then slightly built Lee found it all a bit daunting and still wanting an involvement in the game, signed up to umpiring.

He started in the seconds and on the boundary for firsts but slowly began to make himself a name.

A straight talker with an open mind became one of the best umpires in the history of football to grace Sydney grounds.

He umpired  the 1963, 67 & 68 Sydney grand finals plus grand finals on the South Coast and Newcastle.

Malcolm was President of the Umpires’ Association from 1966-70, treasurer in 1962 and umpires’ coach between 1971-75.

After this Mal moved away from Sydney and lost contact with his friends and peers.

His standout involvement led to him being inducted into the NSW Umpires’ Australian Football Hall of Fame in 2001.  Unfortunately the honour could not be bestowed on him personally because his whereabouts were unknown.

Jim McSweeney realised this anomaly and after making contact with Mal and knowing he was to be in Sydney, made arrangements for the plaque to be presented to him at his Christmas visit to his family.

2014 Old Umpires Group thumbnail 2014 Mal Lees Umpires Award thumbnail
back l-r: Graham Allomes, Bill Allen, Chris Huon,
Unknown, Front: Len Palmer, Mal Lee, Jeff Dempsey
The Award

Jim also arranged for several of his old colleagues to be present at the informal ceremony, including Len Palmer, Bill Allen, Chris Huon, Grahm Allomes, Jeff Dempsey and ? .  Their attendance was a surprise.

They are all photographed here with Mal holding his award.2014 Ian Granland and Mal Lee thumbnail

Unfortunately Jim could not join then after being rushed to hospital for a triple by-pass.  He is recovering well.

While in Sydney and out of the blue, he and his family paid a visit to the Society’s Rooms at Wests Magpies Club.  Fortunately it was on a Tuesday, the day that some members of the committee gather at the club for their working bees.

He was shown various items relating the the period in which he was involved, particularly with regards to umpiring.  He was able to identify several personnel from the umpiring fraternity in the numerous photographs the Society have in their collection. Also, Mal offered several items of memorabilia he has in his possession which relate to his time in Sydney and state football.  During his visit he took out a 3 year membership subscription with the Society

Malcolm is pictured here with the Football History Society President, Ian Granland.

UMPIRING MEMORIES

1970s Sydney Umpires smallWow, have we unearthed a plethora of photos from the umpiring fraternity from the late sixties into the eighties.

Committeeman, Ian Wright contacted former umpiring guru, Jim McSweeney who seconded former Society member, Chris Huon, to help identify a mysterious umpiring group from what we thought was the 1970s – attached.

The image was taken at Erskineville Oval, the umpires’ training venue at the time, on Monday 9 March 1970, where VFL Assistant Umpires’ Advisor, Norm Grant visited Sydney to present lectures and assist umpires in the finer points of their particular discipline.  He also visited the South Coast.  Umpires trained on Mondays and Wednesdays.

His week long visit was funded by the Rothmans National Sport Foundation, an organisation set up by the manufacturers of Rothmans Cigarettes to promote the development and education of various sports.  It is fair to say that the local league received a reasonable amount of assistance from the Foundation.

Fortunately, both McSweeney and Huon were able to identify 90% of those in this picture which we have since named.

The umpires’ coach in 1970 was Brian O’Donoghue, who also acted as field umpire.  In the photo is Graham Allomes, who is reputed to have boundary umpired in more games than any other person in senior league football and is identified in the centre row.

While the majority in the photograph have been identified there are some that have not.  If you can assist, please let us know.