– Player availability at the 1947 Carnival

In past days, the Australian National Football Council (ANFC) the peak body for the game in Australia, since absorbed by the AFL, conducted regular interstate carnivals where states played against other states in a round robin situation.  Since WWII, because of the obvious disparity in standard, these carnivals were comprised of two divisions. They do not hold these type of events any more.

In 1947 Hobart hosted the first carnival following the war, the overall attendance and gate was marginally larger than the 1924 carnival, also held at Hobart (see image).

Carnivals of this nature are a testing time for players.  The 1947 event was conducted over 10 days (including rest days) which is a fair commitment for all the players and officials who also at that time had to hold down a job, so it meant taking holidays.

New South Wales played four games:

  1.   defeated Canberra (as the nation’s capital team was then known, now ACT) 18-22 (130) to 7-8 (50)
  2.   lost to Tasmania in what was described as a fantastic match 16-10 (106) to 13-18 (96)
  3.   lost to South Australia 17-9 (111) to 5-10 (40)
  4.   defeated Queensland 14-16 (100) to 5-12 (42)

The major issue of the carnival was the weather.  Before their third game against South Australia officials seriously considered cancelling the game.  The North Hobart Oval was described as a “mud pie – again” and “atrocious” by a number of newspapers.  It was so bad that the umpire could not bounce the ball and for the division 1 games officials decided to use a new ball each quarter however the poor old division 2 matches could only get a new ball at half time in their games!

The other problem for New South Wales, in particular, was the growing injury list.  By the last game they had ten injured players and under normal circumstances these men would not have played but the team had no replacements.

It was so bad that an application was made to the authorities to allow the NSW coach, 38 year old Frank Dixon to play.  Initially the request was granted along with permission for an Eastern Suburbs player, Jack Nicholls, a visitor to the carnival but subsequently permission was withdrawn because other teams did not have the same luxury.  Dixon who had successfully captained and coached the South Sydney Club before the war had not played since his return to Australia following a severe wound received at El Alemein in North Africa during WWII.

These were the days before interchange and NSW took the field with the bare eighteeen players along with Newtown’s injured Frank Larkin standing by, hoping not to play as 19th man.  And that was their complement for the match. Queensland, by the way, had similar problems.

Frank Larkin

NSW won the game easily however Larkin had to take the field late in the last quarter as a replacement for another injured player.  When the game finished, Larkin was the only player standing with a clean, sky blue jumper.  In an act of frivolity his team mates rushed to Larkin and rolled him in the mud so he finished up in the same fashion as themselves.

In the evening the North Hobart Club organised a ball for the wounded NSW team.

You can check out the games on our site here.

– What Could Have Been and What Didn’t Happen

The Sydney Football League, NSW AFL, AFL Sydney or whatever title you want to give it, and its had a number of changes over the years, has really made few ground break decisions in its 124 year history.

In many cases the officials who ruled the game simply missed the boat.

The licensing laws only permitted a certain number of licensed clubs to operate in NSW up until the mid 1950s and this number did not vary.

Following WWII, Frank Dixon, who captained and coached the South Sydney club in a very successful period in the 1930s was appointed vice president of the league.  He talked the executive into him approaching the then, Australian National Football Council (ANFC) for a loan of $10,000 to establish a licensed club in Sydney.

Dixon, a staunch Labor man who ended up Deputy Lord Mayor or Sydney City Council, travelled to Melbourne by train in 1949 to attend a ANFC Meeting.  Incidentally, on the train happened to be the prime minister, Ben Chifley.  Dixon returned with the guarantee of the $10,000 from the ANFC but a nervous executive in Sydney went cold on the idea and it never went ahead.

In 1948 three new clubs were admitted to the league, Western Suburbs, Balmain and Sydney University.  Wests were the only club to go on taste success.  They played off in successive grand finals of 1952-53 but had to wait until 1963 until they won a flag.  Neither Balmain nor Sydney University clubs could boast success until much, much later.

In the meantime a team from Illawarra joined the competition in 1949-50 but the travel and their lack of success accounted for their departure.

This was a time when six clubs dominated the competition, Eastern Suburbs, Sydney Naval, Newtown, St George, North Shore and Western Suburbs.  Liverpool joined the competition in 1954 after a couple of successful seasons in the Metropolitan Australian National Football Assn (MANFA – or really a Second Division, which folded in 1953).  It was a time when the league should have bitten the bullet and formed two divisions.  It didn’t.  Sydney was a growing city and the league should have capitalised on the popularity of the game during the war and immediately after.

This was particularly the case again in the early 1960s after Uni had dropped out in 1958 but replaced by new club, Bankstown.  Again they should have travelled down the two division track but failed to act.

In 1960 however they did introduce a dramatic change to Sydney football when they reduced the number of players on the field to 16.  This was thought to produce better football on the smaller Sydney grounds and perhaps encourage the formation of new clubs and reduce the instances of backing up to a minimal.

The purists were enraged with this change and by mid-season clubs forced the hand of the league executive to return to the traditional eighteen aside.

The basically unsuccessful club of Liverpool joined forces with the other battler, Bankstown in 1962 then two years later encouraged another new club, Parramatta to combine with them to form a new club: Southern Districts.  Initially this venture  produced a competitive club but eventually failed.  What it did do in particular was rob a team playing Australian Game from the then far western suburbs.  Parramatta then played out of Mona Park, Auburn.

It was around the same time that efforts were being encouraged to form a licensed club for Australian football in Sydney.  They had enough members, sufficient commitment and had identified premises at 224 Riley Street Surry Hills, a former hotel which was then trading as a private hotel (boarding house).

The prime mover in this action unfortunately died and so without a leader the whole issue fell flat.

Eastern Suburbs had a licensed club at Bondi Junction but as successful as it was could not maintain the repayments to a very expensive loan which funded the addition to the premises and the club fell by the wayside.  North Shore went all out to gain a license in the premises of Polonia Northside soccer club in Walker Street North Sydney. They were successful in this enterprise but unfortunately too this eventually failed.

St George made it to the licensing court but were refused their bid for a license at Olds Park on some technicality.

Despite all this, there has been some success in Sydney football and this was quite recently.

Garry Burkinshaw, the man in charge of Sydney footy between 2007-2014 soon realised there were problems when he took over the reigns.

He listened to the gripes, he looked how they do it in soccer and studied Sydney football.

Burkinshaw maintained that Sydney footy was not as tribal as it is interstate.  Players come to play their game and go.  They don’t stick around for the next game and they certainly don’t stay all day.

He decided the answer was divisionalisation where teams from various clubs of apparent equal strength would be best suited playing against each other.  So, apart from the Premier League competition, a reserve grade team which might have battled in the senior division was dropped to third or fourth division in the new setup.

He took advice from clubs and said there was no real opposition to the model.  He got members from each club in a room and put his proposition.  It took over three months in the planning and together with colleague, Bob Robinson, they introduced a competition which has, for the most part, been extremely successful.

There are more teams winning games and all but St George, Camden and Illawarra clubs, from twenty four participating in the Sydney league,  have participated in finals.

This new and novel competition has promoted success in other clubs too.  Penrith who were down to one team now boast three, North-West are fielding more sides along with Camden and there a four new clubs now participating in the competition. (this article was initially published in 2012)

This new system leaves it open for established teams to field more teams and enthuse new or junior clubs to field senior teams.  The way is open for the establishment of more clubs but most particularly, nearly all competitions in Sydney senior football are competitive.

The downside to divisionalisation is that clubs MUST be particularly organised.  Three teams could be playing at three different locations so all players and officials have had to commit themselves to turn up,  in all probability in these circumstances, there would be not players to back up in the event there is not a full team to take the field.  Each team must be a self contained unit: umpire (if required), goal umpire, runner, water boys, manager, runner etc.

At least one Sydney initiative has succeeded but apparently with those purists at it again is now up for change

 

 

– Jack Dean Interview – now includes part 2

The Society has released an historical interview with Jack Dean, now deceased, which was recorded in 2011.  Click the link which will take you to the site where you can listen.  When you bring up this link, click the > feature marked on the black ‘recording’ icon.

www.nswfootballhistory.com.au/?post_type=podcast&p=20614&preview=true

www.nswfootballhistory.com.au/podcast/jack-dean-interview/

Jack Dean Interview, part II
www.nswfootballhistory.com.au/podcast/jack-dean-interview-part-ii/

Society officials said they were very fortunate in locating the recording after a dozen interviews of former Sydney football players and personalties were given to the State Library of NSW for safe keeping but now find they are unable to obtain copies to load onto this site.

Jack Dean was a powerful man during his time in Sydney football and he was inducted into the Sydney Hall of Fame in 2003.  Here is a little of his bio:
“Born in Sydney and due to his father’s influence (Joe Dean also played for “Easts) he joined the Eastern Suburbs Football Club at the age of 16. Jack was chosen to play for NSW at 17 then became a driving force as a ruckman at Eastern Suburbs and went on to represent NSW 25 times. Played in Easts premiership teams between 1953-58, coached Ardlethan FC in the Riverina for 1959-60 seasons before returning to coach Eastern Suburbs in 1961. In 1962 Jack crossed to Sydney Naval and played there until he retired in 1966. He won 4 Best & Fairest Awards and 4 Runner Up Awards with Easts and in 1958 won the Best & Fairest Trophy representing NSW in the Centenary Carnival in Melbourne.  Later, he became a State Selector for 12 years.

Jack was President of Easts from 1970-82 during which the club won 6 premierships. He received the ANFC Merit Award for Service to Australian Football in 1977. Jack was involved with Easts Juniors as a coach and was Junior State Selector for the NSW Under 15 Shell Cup and Manager on several Shell Cup Interstate trips. In a career spanning 20 years, Jack played 310 games for Easts, 45 for Sydney Naval, 40 for Ardlethan and 25 for NSW. He also won Best & Fairest Awards for NSW against Western Australia, Queensland and ACT during his career.”

Jack was twice nominated for the AFL Hall of Fame in Melbourne without a positive result.

He lived in Paddington for the greater part of his life and was one who was involved not only in local football but also with the successful application for a licence for his club which became ‘East Rules club’.

Fortunately we have located the second tape of this interview series which is also now posted on this site.  Both tapes end abruptly and unfortunately our equipment at this stage does not provide the apparatus to correct this, but we are working on it.

Treasurer, John Addison, is now working on loading the six part interview with Frank Dixon interview.  Dixon is also a member of the Sydney Hall of Fame.  He was very actively involved in Sydney football both before and after WWII.  He is a former Deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney after which the Frank Dixon Grandstand at Trumper park was named.  These interviews should be on our site mid next week.

Both of these men provide very interesting insights to Sydney football.

– Podcasts on The Increase

Frank Dixon
      Frank Dixon

The Society has moved more seriously into posting podcasts on their website.

To those who are not familiar with podcasts, this might explain:  a digital audio file made available on the internet for downloading to a computer or portable media player, typically available as a series, new installments of which can be received by subscribers automatically.

In our case they are interviews with football personalities from Sydney whose experiences throw some light on what Australian football was like in years gone by.  We intend to carry out more of these in coming months.  The Society has A grade audio equipment which will be used in this pursuit

A number of interviews were carried out over the past 15 years but with no-where to keep or maintain them at the time, the tapes were lodged with the State Library of NSW.  Now there is a battle to get copies of these released back to the Society.

All of those interviewed are now deceased.

Nevertheless one or two or the tapes are still in the Society’s possession and they are currently undergoing the process of digitisation.

This interview with Frank Dixon has been segmented into nine parts and is slowly now being loaded onto the site.  It is a very interesting discussion recorded in 1997 by the president of the Society, Ian Granland.  Click Frank’s image to hear a short clip.

“I didn’t set out to make this a professional recording” Mr Granland said.  “I was living on the Central Coast of NSW, not far from Frank and full well knowing his involvement in the sport in NSW, I was keen to get some of his experiences down on tape, given that he was in his late eighties.  I just used an old reel to reel tape recorder that I purchased when I was in Vietnam.”

“The problem with these particular recordings is that the microphone I used was sub-standard so my voice might be a bit difficult to understand.  On the other hand Frank’s voice comes over loud and clear and he gives a wonderful insight of his life from birth until the 1960s.  I can really recommend you listening to these recordings if you are interested in local footy and his life in general.  Click here to check out the recordings so far posted.  A warning though, some of these are quite big files so may take a little longer than normal to load.  Utilise the option: Play In New Window for faster results.

Frank was young enough to play on the NSWAFL owned Australian Football Ground at North Botany (Alexandria).  He had a magnetic personality and was later captain-coach of the South Sydney Club during their stellar period in the 1930s.

He enlisted in the army early in the Second World War and was almost bombed out of existence at Tobruk where he was wounded.

After the war he was a vice president of the NSW Football League and tells of one of his experiences travelling to Melbourne in the train.

He coached the NSW state team between about 1948-55.  Later he was elected Deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney and became involved in the East Sydney club’s successful bid for a licensed club.

Frank Dixon was a good man and one the code can be very proud of.  He is a member of the Sydney Football Hall of Fame.

Interview with Frank Dixon – Part 1


Interview with Frank Dixon:

Frank Dixon NSWAFL Vice President, State CoachFrank first began playing football with a junior club, the Daceyville Waratahs in about 1926 and was later called up to the South Sydney Club where he went on to play over 150 first grade games.

He was a natural born leader and extremely popular figure in the league. He captained and coached South Sydney between 1934-39, taking the side to premierships in 1934 & 35 and runner up in 1936 & 37. He represented NSW on 9 occasions and state captain from 1935-37. Wounded in the war he turned to coaching the NSW between1947-52 he was appointed coach NSW State Team. Frank later entered local politics where he became Deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney between 1960-62 with the then newly constructed grandstand at Trumper Park, Paddington named after him in recognition of his services to the game.  He was captain,  player then captain and coach of South Sydney Football Club ”

interviewed by Ian Granland, President of the Society

Some of Season 1960

Threepence smallHopefully by the end of today we will have posted all of the Sydney Football Records we have from 1927 and now including seasons 1982-3.

Some information from 1960 in particular is very riveting.  Amongst them are those of the Australian National Football Council Section 2 Championships played at Trumper Park in Sydney over a period of seven days.

With the passage of time and the constant change of administrators at the NSW Football League, this is one series that has been forgotten.

The combatants were: NSW, VFA, Queensland and “Canberra“ the latter playing under that title until midway through the 1970s. Here are the results:

 

DATE

WINNER

SCORE

LOSER

SCORE

25 June NSW 14-24 (108) QLD 13-19 (107)
26 June VFA 17-31 (133) Canberra 3-11 (29)
29 June NSW 13-13 (92) Canberra 13-12 (90)
29 June VFA 22-20 (152) QLD 3-7 (25)
2 July Canberra 16-16 (112) QLD 13-10 (88)
3 July VFA 23-24 (162) NSW 8-9 (57)

 

As well, there were some extraordinary lead-up games, particularly the games played during the week.

Before the VFA v Canberra match, Sydney University, who were not competing in the Sydney league that year, 13-11 (99) d Combined Newcastle 6-5 (41).

In the match Canberra v Qld, the curtain raiser was East Side v West Side while on the following day, which turned out to be the final in the game VFA v NSW, the Navy 9-16 (70) d Army 4-9 (33).

Frank DixonA very interesting aspect to the 1960 season which a few readers may remember, was the opening of the Frank Dixon (pictured) Stand at Trumper Park. It replaced a dilapidated timber stand which was built early in the first decade of last century and stood almost on the corner of Glenmore Road and Hampton Street.

Frank was a very charismatic character and a long time player and supporter of the game in Sydney.

While he probably deserves a page on his own (which we will work on) Frank was born and raised in Doncaster Avenue, Kingsford.  After attending St Mary’s Cathedral High School, he played rugby league as a youth then switched to Australian Football in 1926 turning out with with the Daceyville Waratahs Junior club, winning the best and fairest in his first year.

He later played with South Sydney and coached them to the 1934 & 35 premierships as well as runner-up in 1936 & 37.

He represented NSW on nine occasions from 1935-37 and at one stage was a player-coach of the state team.

Frank enlisted for the Second World War where he was wounded at El Alamein, later became a proud ‘Rat of Tobruk’.

Upon return he was elected senior vice president of the NSW Football League and subsequently appointed non-playing state coach from 1947-1952.

He was involved in politics and for a number of years a Labor alderman for the ward of Fitzroy in the City of Sydney Council.  He was deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney between 1960-62.

The new stand was opened on 25 June by Sydney Lord Mayor Harry Jensen and named after this legend of the game in Sydney.

The new stand, since now remodelled if not almost destroyed, “will seat 1500 people and has first class amenities, including tiled bath and shower rooms and dance hall and refreshment room.”

1960

Threepence smallThis week we updated the 1960 Sydney Football Records Collection online and found them very interesting reading.

This now completes the full quota of Football Records published in that year.  To view, click here.

Unique to this season was the posting of more than one Record per round. Then, the league printed a certain number of Football Records for each particular match which included the team lists of only those competing teams. So in effect, each game received a different Record.

More interestingly is the posting of the full publication of all the Records from the Australian National Football Council Section 2 Championships played at Trumper Park in Sydney over a period of seven days.

With the passage of time and the constant change of administrators at the NSW Football League, this is one series that has been forgotten.

The combatants were: NSW, VFA, Queensland and Canberra, the latter played under that title until midway through the 1970s. Here are the results:

 

DATE WINNER SCORE LOSER SCORE
25 June NSW 14-24 (108) QLD 13-19 (107)
26 June VFA 17-31 (133) Canberra 3-11 (29)
29 June NSW 13-13 (92) Canberra 13-12 (90)
29 June VFA 22-20 (152) QLD 3-7 (25)
2 July Canberra 16-16 (112) QLD 13-10 (88)
3 July VFA 23-24 (162) NSW 8-9 (57)

 

As well, there were some extraordinary lead-up games, particularly the games played during the week.

Before the VFA v Canberra match, Sydney University, who were not competing in the Sydney league that year, 13-11 (99) d Combined Newcastle 6-5 (41).

Frank Dixon - NSW AFL Vice President, State Coach & Captain. Capt Coach Sth Sydney FCIn the match Canberra v Qld, the curtain raiser was East Side v West Side while on the following day, which turned out to be the final in the game VFA v NSW, the Navy 9-16 (70) d Army 4-9 (33).

A very interesting aspect to the 1960 season which a few readers may remember, was the opening of the Frank Dixon (pictured) Stand at Trumper Park. It replaced a dilapidated timber grandstand which was built early in the first decade of last century and stood almost on the corner of Glenmore Road and Hampton Street.  At its best it held 150 people with the change rooms at the top of the stairs, which proved a real problem with players, dodging the females with whirling umbrellas while running to their cold showers after the game.

The new stand was opened on 25 June by Sydney Lord Mayor Harry Jensen and named after a legend of the game in Sydney.  Frank Dixon was a former deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney.

This new stand, since remodelled if not almost destroyed, will seat 1500 people and has first class amenities, including tiled bath and shower rooms and dance hall and refreshment room.

JACK DEAN ‘PRINCE OF PLAYERS’ IN SYDNEY FOOTBALL

Jack-Dean3-207x300In the 1949 interstate match between NSW and Victoria at the SCG nineteen year old East Sydney ruckman Jack Dean went up against veteran Victorian captain Jack Dyer at the opening bounce.

“He sat me on my arse!” Jack told me over a few beers. We were at Harry McAsey’s pub in Alexandra after a tribute lunch for our late mate and fellow NSW Football History committee member Ted Ray a few years ago. I put the tape on to record our conversation which was considerably enhanced by the consumption of schooners of Reschs.

“The Vics. cleaned us up that day, but it was a great thrill to play against them” recalled Jack. “We thought we were a chance, our coach Frank Dixon (later a Deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney) was a great motivator and we trained for weeks in advance with a view to beating them”.

Victoria were ‘too polished’ according to Keith Miller’s report in The Daily Mirror. Yes, that’s right, the great Australian cricket all-rounder who had recently retired from football had taken up a new career as a journalist. Miller had represented NSW at the ANFC interstate carnival in 1947 after moving to Sydney to play cricket for NSW after the Second World War.

In addition to the grizzly old Tiger, Jack Dyer, other famous names in the Victorian team for that match were Bob Davis, Bobby Rose, Les Foote, Don Cordner and Bert Clay, who if state-of-origin rules were in place would have been wearing a sky blue guernsey. Clay was recruited to Fitzroy from Henty in southern NSW.

Jack Dean played 25 times for NSW in interstate matches and was voted the Blues best player at the 1958 centenary carnival in Melbourne in 1958. He must have been unlucky not to have been selected in the All-Australian team.

Born and bred in Paddington, Jack went down to Trumper Park with his brother Mal in 1944 and thus began a distinguished football career that took in almost 400 games until he retired in 1966.

His father Joe had played for East Sydney and Jack’s son Marshall also played for Easts. A handy rover, ‘Marsh’ is a raconteur who in tandem with Stephen ‘Bomber’ McClure (brother of Mark ‘Sellers’ McClure) provided their team-mates with many hilarious moments at their favourite pub in Paddington, the Grand National.

Jack was a star performer in the Easts teams that won a staggering six premierships in a row from 1952-59 firstly under captain-coach, Fred Pemberton, then Alf Penno with the last under club legend Roy Hayes. Following his stand-out performance at the 1958 carnival Jack took up an offer to coach Ardlethan in the South-West League in southern NSW.

“I was the only non-ex VFL player coaching in the league.”  ‘The Heap’ (former South Melbourne captain Ian Gillett) was coaching Coolamon, ex North Melbourne star Gerald Eastmure was in charge at Leeton, Footscray’s Brownlow medalist Peter Box was coaching Grongy (Grong Grong Matong), and Don Keyter (ex South Melbourne) was at Griffith. “It was a strong league”, recalled Jack.

“We struggled to match it with the clubs from the bigger places, but we always took it up to them. We had lots of good times afterwards particularly at the London (Ardlethan’s only pub). After 6 o’clock the publican would pull down the blinds and we’d have a great sing-along around the piano. The other clubs used to love to stay back after a game at Ardlethan”

“We made lots of good friends down there and still in contact with them”, but Joy (Jack’s wife) was a city girl and was pretty keen to return to Sydney to be near family, so we came back.”

Jack returned to his old club, East Sydney for the 1961 season. But the next season Jack was enticed to join local rivals Sydney Naval that shared Trumper Park with Easts, but trained down at Rushcutters Bay.

“I’d formed a close friendship with (rover) Danny Wilson through playing together in state teams. Plus, of course, there was a bob in it for me. They were a well run club at this stage and were well supported by some of Sydney’s biggest bookmakers who fielded at the races on Saturdays and came to the Aussie Rules on Sundays.”

Sydney Naval beat Newtown for the 1962 premiership in Sydney of which Jack was part. He played out his career with Sydney Naval until he retired in 1966.

Following this, Jack then turned his hand to administration and after joining the East Sydney committee became club president from 1970 till 1982.  He presided over another golden period for the Bulldogs during which they won six premierships. The most satisfying was for the club’s centenary year, 1980, when under Austin Robertson they thrashed North Shore in the grand final at the Sydney Showgrounds by 121 points.

“After going through the previous season undefeated we got beaten in both finals, which was terribly disappointing. We got ‘Oscar’ to take over from Alex Ruscuklic. We had assembled a very good team with players like Wayne Goss, Ian Allen, Grant Luhrs and Jim Richardson, plus we had retained Peter Ruscuklic as full-forward.”

Ruscuklic was a prolific goal kicker for Easts booting huge tallies of 136 (1979), 156 (1980), and 213 (1981).

A big let-down was expected the next season after the centenary triumph, but Jack had the inspiration to appoint local player Greg ‘Huey’ Harris, who had returned to footy from rugby union in 1979 and missed the premiership season with a knee injury.

Harris master-minded one of the great comebacks in Sydney footy history by leading the Bulldogs to a 89 point win over Sam Kekovich’s Newtown in the 1981 grand final. Easts had been down by 90 points at ¾ time in the second semi but came back to lose by only 10 points.

“Greg was a natural leader. He possesses great people skills, he can lead men. I had become a good friend of his father Col, who I played against when he coached St George. I just knew he would make a successful coach”

“Huey’ sure did he led East Sydney to premierships in 1981, 1982 and 1983 moulding a bunch of eccentric characters and ace footballers into an almost unbeatable combination. Easts won another premiership for good measure in 1984 under Wayne Goss“ Jack Dean was chairman of selectors.

Jack was a selector for many years for State teams and was Alan Jean’s trusted chairman of selectors when Jeans coached NSW in the Escort Cup in 1979-80 when the Blues almost upset the highly fancied Fitzroy (remember the ‘fat full forward for NSW’ Laurie Pendrick kicking 7 goals on then Victorian full-back Harvey Merrigan?) and Richmond in its premiership season.

Jack would go out to the airport in his plumbing truck and pick up Jeans for training. “He is a terrific fellow (Alan Jeans), a great football brain, but more importantly he had the ability to pass it on” according to Jack.

He continued on as chairman of selectors under Sam Kekovich and later, Greg Harris. It was in this period that I got to know Jack as I was the Country team manager for the state squad. Sam and Jack would fly down to Wagga on weekends to conduct training. Following a brisk, light training run we would head off with fellow selectors local legend Greg Leitch and former Essendon star Bobby Greenwood (who would drive over from Griffith in his Pontiac Parisienne) for a long lunch to discuss team selections.

In those days most people in Wagga stayed at home for a roast on Sundays so I used to get a Chinese restaurant to open up especially for us. Sam would always order up big, then feign that he’d forgotten his credit card and ask Jack if he could pay for the meal and claim it back from the league. Jack would always pay and never make a claim.

These days Jack is highly involved in the NSW Footy History Committee and he heads up the committee that selects the members for the local Hall of Fame each year.

Jack was the first player elected to the NSW Hall of Fame in 2003. The Eastern Suburbs-UNSW best and fairest trophy is also named in his honour. He is also a life member of the club.

This year Jack has been nominated for the AFL’s Hall of Fame. In recent years players and officials from the other states have been justly honoured but there is yet to be a non VFL/AFL player from NSW elected. Unlike the other nomination from North Melbourne via North Wagga, there are no issues about character. Jack Dean is True Blue.

Story by Rod Gillett – former Commissioner NSWAFL and former History Society Committee person.

LOST OPPORTUNITIES AND WHAT COULD HAPPEN WITH PERSISTENCE AND PLANNING

The Sydney Football League, NSW AFL, AFL Sydney or whatever title you want to give it, and its had a number of changes over the years, has really made few ground break decisions in its 124 year history.

In many cases the officials who ruled the game simply missed the boat.

The licensing laws only permitted a certain number of licensed clubs to operate in NSW up until the mid 1950s and this number did not vary.

Despite this and following WWII, Frank Dixon, who captained and coached the South Sydney club in a very successful period in the 1930s was appointed vice president of the league.  He was later to become a successful NSW coach.

Dixon talked the executive into him approaching the then, Australian National Football Council for a loan of $10,000 to establish a licensed club in Sydney.  He was a man of vision.

Dixon, a staunch Labor man who ended up Deputy Lord Mayor or Sydney City Council, just so happened to travel to Melbourne on the train with prime minister, Ben Chifley.  He returned with the guarantee of the $10,000 but a nervous executive in Sydney went cold on the idea and it never went ahead.

In 1948 three new clubs were admitted to the league, Western Suburbs, Balmain and Sydney University.  Wests were the only club to go on taste success.  They played off in successive grand finals of 1952-53 but had to wait until 1963 until they won their first flag.  Neither Balmain nor Sydney University clubs could boast success until much, much later.

In the meantime a team from Illawarra joined the competition in 1949-50 but the travel and their lack of success accounted for their departure.

This was a time when six clubs dominated the competition, Eastern Suburbs, Sydney Naval, Newtown, St George, North Shore and Western Suburbs.  And it was a time when the league should have bit the bullet and formed two divisions.  It didn’ t.

This was particularly the case in the early 1960s when Uni had dropped out but replaced by Liverpool and a team from Bankstown.  Again they should have travelled down the two division track but failed to act.

In 1960 however they did introduce a dramatic change to Sydney football when they reduced the number of players on the field to 16.  This was thought to produce better on the smaller Sydney grounds and perhaps encourage the formation of new clubs and reduce the instances of backing up to a minimal.

Another reason was that initially the Australian National Football League were going to conduct their centenary carnival in Melbourne with teams, 16 aside.  This decision was reversed early in the season.

The purists were enraged with this change and mid-season clubs forced the hand of the executive to return to the traditional sixteen aside.

As you can see opinion was divided as to course the league should take.

Liverpool joined forces with Bankstown in 1962 then two years later encouraged Parramatta to join and form a new club, Southern Districts.  This of course eventually failed but what it did in particular was rob a team playing Australian Game from the then far western suburbs.  Parramatta was playing out of Mona Park, Auburn and like other clubs came into the Sydney competition raw, with no actual football experience.

It was around the same time that efforts were being encouraged to form a licensed club for Australian football in Sydney.  They had enough members, sufficient commitment and had identified premises at 224 Riley Street Surry Hills, a former hotel which was then trading as a private hotel (boarding house) as a potential site for the club.

The prime mover in this action, Arthur Davey, unfortunately died and so without a leader the whole issue fell flat.

Eastern Suburbs had a licensed club at Bondi Junction but over capitalised in their additions and failed.  North Shore went all out to gain a license in the premises of Polonia Northside soccer club in Walker Street North Sydney.  Unfortunately this too failed.

St George at least made it to the licensing court but were refused their bid for a license at Olds Park on some technicality.

Despite all this, there has been some success in Sydney football and this was quite recently.

Garry Burkinshaw, the man in charge of Sydney footy soon realised there were problems when he took over the reigns in 2007.

He listened to the gripes, he looked how they do it in soccer and most of all, studied Sydney football.

Burkinshaw maintained that Sydney footy was not as tribal as it is interstate.  Players come to play their game and go.  They don’t stick around for the next game and they certainly don’t stay all day.

He decided the answer was divisionalisation where teams from various clubs would be best suited playing against each other.  So, apart from the Premier League competition, a reserve grade team which might have battled in the senior division was dropped to third or fourth division in the new setup.

He took advice from clubs and said there was no real opposition to the model.  He got members from each club in a room and put his proposition.  It took over three months in the planning and together with colleague, Bob Robinson, they introduced a competition which has, for the most part, extremely successful.

There are more teams winning games and all but St George, Camden and Illawarra clubs, from twenty four participating in the Sydney league,  have participated in finals.

This new and novel competition has promoted success in other clubs too.  Penrith who were down to one team now boast three, North-West are fielding more sides along with Camden and their a four new clubs now participating in the competition.

This new system leaves it open for established teams to field more teams and enthuse new or junior clubs to field senior teams.  The way is open for more clubs but most particular, nearly all competitions are competitive.

The downside to divisionalisation is that clubs MUST be particularly organised.  Three teams could be playing at three different locations so all players must commit themselves to turn up, each team must be a self contained unit: umpire (if required), goal umpire, runner, water boys, manager, runner etc.

At least one Sydney initiative has succeeded.  Change can be so very difficult to introduce.

Top photograph shows Frank Dixon, the lower image is of Garry Burkinshaw.  The documents are taken from the Football Records of the day.