Rep Games in 1947

One of the gun NSW Players from 1947: Frank Larkin

During the past ten months or so we have written a number of stories on the year 1947 but we found there is more to be said.

In that year the NSW Football League (NSWANFL) played TWELVE representative matches – four of which were played on consecutive days over respective weekends (see green shade). Three of these games were played in Sydney and the other in Broken Hill;  all were against different opponents.  Of course the respective NSW teams that played on the both days of these same weekends were made up of different players.

Now if you have ever been involved with representative football or even club football, putting a team on the field requires a fair amount of planning, commitment and work.  The team which travelled to Tasmania comprised of players from Sydney, Broken Hill, Riverina and Albury.

Now granted 1947 was a year of a national carnival, played in Hobart (shaded in yellow) which made up four of the games, but nevertheless the other matches required players, managers, trainers, jumpers, shorts and socks and the list goes on.

In one of our earlier posts about 1947 we mentioned that the league secretary of the time, Ken Ferguson, made a public appeal for ‘clothing coupons’ in order to purchase player ‘clothing.’  Remember, this was just two years after the finish of WWII and the general public were still operating under the coupon system for food and clothing etc.

When the NSW Carnival team returned from Hobart, as if they didn’t have enough football, the league arranged for this side to play “The Rest” on the following weekend.

‘The Rest’ were made up from players not chosen in the NSW Carnival contingent but were Sydney players selected in the other NSW teams whilst the main team was in Tasmania.

So from a competition of seven Sydney clubs a total of 66 players were involved in representative football during that year. A further six were selected from clubs outside the metropolitan area.

Here are the matches:

DATE VENUE OPPOSITION NSW SCORE OPPOSITION
SCORE
WON/LOST
1947-05-25 Sydney Queensland 20.13 (133) 15-17 (107) Won
1947-06-01 Sydney Broken Hill 18-15 (123) 8-13 (61) Won
1947-06-14 Broken Hill Broken Hill 12-12 (84) 11-9 (75) Lost
1947-06-15 Sydney Canberra 21-9 (135) 19-16 (130) Won
1947-06-21 Brisbane Queensland 18-22 (130) 18-24 (132) Won
1947-07-30 Hobart Canberra 13-18 (96) 7-8 (50) Won
1947-08-01 Hobart Tasmania 6-10 (46) 16-10 (106) Lost
1947-08-06 Hobart South Australia 14-12 (86) 17-9 (111) Lost
1947-08-08 Hobart Queensland 8-11 (59) 5-12 (42) Won
1947-08-09 Sydney Subiaco FC 12-6 (76) 11-10 (76) Lost
1947-08-10 Sydney East Fremantle FC 20-13 (133) 15-11 (101) Lost
1947-08-17 Sydney “The Rest” 21-18 (144) 13-16 (94) Won

You can see by the last score that the better players in the Sydney competition were chosen for the main NSW team.
All NSW games from 1881-1947, together with all their details, players, umpires and scores are listed here.

Ref.
NSWAFL 1947 annual report
NSWAFFL 1947 Football Records
Metropolitan and Broken Hill newspapers of the day

– 1947 Job Offers

 The 1947 NSW
Carnival Team Opening
Parade @ Hobart

In 1947, an All-States Carnival was played in Hobart.

These seven team contests were played about every four years.  After World War II because of the disparity in standard, the Australian National Football Council,  divided the competition into two divisions.  New South Wales found themselves in division two along with Queensland, Tasmania and Canberra.  This meant in Hobart they should have played three matches;  They won their games quite handsomely against Queensland Canberra then went down in the final game against Tasmania by ten points 13-18 (96) to 16-10 (106).  They also played South Australia who were a Division I team however were convincingly defeated.

A 1950 pic
of Jim Cracknell
at his best

Following the game it was reported that five of the New South Wales Australian players in their carnival team were offered contracts by two Tasmanian clubs.

The Hobart Club offered Sydney’s captain-coach, Jim Cracknell, Albury FC’s star centre Jim Mathews, and Newtown’s Emrys Owen £10 a week, including a job. Clarence Football Club offered Roy Watterson from the Newtown Club, who would later go on to coach in the Riverina, and South Sydney’s Ron Matthews a job at £8 a week and a retainer of £3 a week.

The report said that the offers would hold good for the following season. Apparently the players are considering the offers, but unknown if they took them up.

Prime Minister Bounces the Ball

How often do you get the Prime Minister bouncing the ball to start a match – IN SYDNEY?

Well it happened in 1933 when the Prime Minister, Joe Lyons was the country’s leader.  Lyons was from Northern Tasmania and trained as a school teacher.  He played both cricket and football before entering the Tasmanian State Parliament.  Originally a Labor man, he was Premier of Tasmania between 1923-28.Hotel Morris - Pitt Street

In 1933 the Australian National Football Council, since usurped by the AFL, conducted their triennial national carnival at the Sydney Cricket Ground.  The NSW side comprised several players from Broken Hill, many of whom reported back to their league following the carnival that they were not treated well.  The eight players from Broken Hill were housed in the Hotel Morris in Pitt Street while those players in the NSW team from Sydney resided at their normal homes.  The Queensland and Canberra teams were also domiciled at the hotel.

Incidentally, the Hotel Morris is still there, at the Railway Square end but now caters mostly for backpackers.

Lyons wasn’t the main act in the opening of the Carnival.  Australia’s first locally born Governor General, Isaac Isaacs, did the honours in the middle of the ground surrounded by a number of other dignitaries, see image.

However, like the 1914 Carnival in Sydney it was not a success.  It lost over £1,000 which equates to $96,500 in today’s terms.

1932 NSW v VFL @ SCG PM bounces ball - Truth 12-6-1932 - ALyons however was talked into bouncing the ball in the opening game between NSW and Victoria and we have been able to obtain a photograph of the event with him in his suit and tie.  Its not in best of condition nevertheless, it captures the moment the prime minister of the time got himself involved in our game – literally.

New South Wales had a reasonably successful carnival despite being trounced in the first match against the VFL.  Having said that the draw for the series was contrived so that the locals were not that hard pressed in most of their games.  They played all but South Australia and finished in fourth place.  The only real standout for them was the naming of local star, Jimmy Stiff, as the carnival’s best player.

NSW results:

Date NSW G P T Opposition G P T Margin
2 August 14 18 102 VFL 23 17 155 53
4 August 19 22 136 Queensland 6 15 51 85
7 August 16 14 110 Canberra 12 10 82 28
10 August 20 12 132 Tasmania 15 17 107 25
12 August 16 18 114 West Aust 17 22 124 10

 

 

NSW v Melbourne FC

Ever s1923-07-31 Sydney Sportsman p.1 A thumbnailince football was played in NSW, a highlight of the season has been the visitation of an interstate team.

Before the establishment of the VFL in 1897 they came from the VFA and South Australia, then after the resurrection of the game in Sydney in 1903 visiting teams came thick and fast:  Geelong, South Melbourne, Williamstown, Carlton, Fitzroy, Collingwood, North Adelaide, Norwood and the list goes on and on.

You can view what teams did visit and how they performed up to 1930 by clicking here and search under ‘Advanced Search’.

On most occasions the visitors left the gate with the NSW Football League to further enhance the game in Sydney.  But, the league battled.  There was never any real foresight, planning and strategies put in place to develop and grow the game in the early days.  They merely survived from year to year.

One club that did visit Sydney on four occasions was the Melbourne Football Club.

They played NSW or a Combined Sydney side on four separate occasions, winning one and losing three, but two of those were within a very close margin.

The game they crowed about was the win in 1911.  NSW won the game 14-12 (96) to 10-14 (74) and didn’t the local press pump up the win.  One headline read: Victors a Trifle Superior All Round, and Home Team Wins Brilliantly but the best read: NSW Whips Melbourne.  Were victories against these interstate teams all that rare – The Answer: Yes.

Some of Season 1960

Threepence smallHopefully by the end of today we will have posted all of the Sydney Football Records we have from 1927 and now including seasons 1982-3.

Some information from 1960 in particular is very riveting.  Amongst them are those of the Australian National Football Council Section 2 Championships played at Trumper Park in Sydney over a period of seven days.

With the passage of time and the constant change of administrators at the NSW Football League, this is one series that has been forgotten.

The combatants were: NSW, VFA, Queensland and “Canberra“ the latter playing under that title until midway through the 1970s. Here are the results:

 

DATE

WINNER

SCORE

LOSER

SCORE

25 June NSW 14-24 (108) QLD 13-19 (107)
26 June VFA 17-31 (133) Canberra 3-11 (29)
29 June NSW 13-13 (92) Canberra 13-12 (90)
29 June VFA 22-20 (152) QLD 3-7 (25)
2 July Canberra 16-16 (112) QLD 13-10 (88)
3 July VFA 23-24 (162) NSW 8-9 (57)

 

As well, there were some extraordinary lead-up games, particularly the games played during the week.

Before the VFA v Canberra match, Sydney University, who were not competing in the Sydney league that year, 13-11 (99) d Combined Newcastle 6-5 (41).

In the match Canberra v Qld, the curtain raiser was East Side v West Side while on the following day, which turned out to be the final in the game VFA v NSW, the Navy 9-16 (70) d Army 4-9 (33).

Frank DixonA very interesting aspect to the 1960 season which a few readers may remember, was the opening of the Frank Dixon (pictured) Stand at Trumper Park. It replaced a dilapidated timber stand which was built early in the first decade of last century and stood almost on the corner of Glenmore Road and Hampton Street.

Frank was a very charismatic character and a long time player and supporter of the game in Sydney.

While he probably deserves a page on his own (which we will work on) Frank was born and raised in Doncaster Avenue, Kingsford.  After attending St Mary’s Cathedral High School, he played rugby league as a youth then switched to Australian Football in 1926 turning out with with the Daceyville Waratahs Junior club, winning the best and fairest in his first year.

He later played with South Sydney and coached them to the 1934 & 35 premierships as well as runner-up in 1936 & 37.

He represented NSW on nine occasions from 1935-37 and at one stage was a player-coach of the state team.

Frank enlisted for the Second World War where he was wounded at El Alamein, later became a proud ‘Rat of Tobruk’.

Upon return he was elected senior vice president of the NSW Football League and subsequently appointed non-playing state coach from 1947-1952.

He was involved in politics and for a number of years a Labor alderman for the ward of Fitzroy in the City of Sydney Council.  He was deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney between 1960-62.

The new stand was opened on 25 June by Sydney Lord Mayor Harry Jensen and named after this legend of the game in Sydney.

The new stand, since now remodelled if not almost destroyed, “will seat 1500 people and has first class amenities, including tiled bath and shower rooms and dance hall and refreshment room.”

A Last Minute Goal – or was it?

1925-08-17 Evening News p.1 (15 Aug match - NSW v VFL) thumbnailIt is August 1925 and you are sitting in a 10,000 strong crowd at the old Erskineville Oval (photo below), watching the second match of a bi-annual series between a NSW combination and a team representing the VFL.  This is the only surviving image taken in the game.

Only weeks before, 12,500 saw Victoria thump NSW at the MCG by over 40 points, which was pretty much the norm since the beginning of these matches in 1903. In that period, NSW had been victorious in only one of their twelve encounters that win was in Sydney.

After WWI the VFL and NSWAFL reached an agreement to play two representative games a year; one in Melbourne and the other in Sydney.

The only issue with this was that the VFL also played other representative games on the same day, normally against South Australia but on occasions against areas like Ballarat and Bendigo. Accordingly, their strongest team was chosen for the major interstate clash with South Australia. This was the situation with this game.

The side playing NSW included three players from St Kilda, two each from the then new clubs of Hawthorn (last), Footscray (second last), North Melbourne (third last), South Melbourne and Richmond together with one each from Geelong (eventually premiers), Essendon (runner-up) , Collingwood (fourth), Carlton, Fitzroy. So the level of talent was less than the best.

Nevertheless the game you watched was keenly fought with the lead changing over the course of the afternoon. You recognize the umpire as a former Richmond and Collingwood player, Len Gibb.

Excitement as the Vics go into the last quarter holding a narrow nine point lead then with six minutes to go, and with Victoria still in front 13-8 to 11-10 there was a sudden burst by NSW — and a successful one, too. Eventually South Sydney player, ‘Flop’ Flynn kicked a beautiful goal. This reduced the VFL’s lead to four points with just three minutes to go.1935 Erskineville Oval (old) 001 small

You hear the crowd’s teeth chatter in delight. Up, up, went the ball towards Victoria’s goal. Free kick! Cheers. It was NSW wingman Bill McKoy’s chance. He took it. Cheers again. He was within the distance. It was almost time for the bell. The crowd was frantic with excitement. A hush enveloped the ground; McKoy took aim. He kicked. Would it reach the distance? In a flash it seemed as nothing would get near to impede its flight but it dropped in elevation and looked as if the ball did not go through the posts. In fact it appeared to be touched. Then, a huge cheer as the umpire’s two flags went up and NSW were in front.

But there were still two minutes to go. Victoria dashed into their stride as the ball was bounced and before time was called, had a shot for goal, which brought only a point. The bell rang, leaving New South Wales victors of a great game by a bare point, 13-10 (88) to Victoria’s 13 9 (87).

But there were questions asked –

Was it a Goal?

The last goal by McKoy, a dual Phelan Medalist, was view with a good degree of conjecture. It was said that a Victorian player marked the ball fully a foot (300mm) inside the playing arena and that if recognized would have saved victory for the visiting side but for (as another said) “the undoubted mistake the goal umpire made just on time by awarding New South Wales a goal …”

Another commentator said:

“One point I wish to make. That last goal. No, it wasn’t, certainly it wasn’t. A Victorian player marked it a foot within the placing space. But it was such a lowly drop-kick, and it sailed so beautifully in the air that one could almost forgive the umpire’s indiscretion in making the wish father to the thought. McKoy is to be congratulated for his coolness during those few seconds when everything depended on the kick.”

However the result is on the board and today we look back 90 years to view a view result with as much pleasure as those who were there.

A final comment was made: “A thousand pities. The incident robbed the game of that little bit of glimmer that adds polish to a most delectable feast. For feast it was. Here were our boys not only holding their own with a picked team from the champion State of Australasia, but also whipping them. Congratulations to New South Wales.” (it doesn’t happen much)

 

Team 1st Qtr Half Time ¾ Time Fulltime
NSW 3-3 8-6 9-7 13-10 (88)
VFL 5-3 7-5 12-7 13-9 (87)
Goals:
NSW Flynn 6, McKoy 2, Vockler 2, Keane, Little, Knott 1 ea
VFL Shelton 5, Hayes 3, Hopkins 3, Brushfield, McCashney 1 ea.
Best:
NSW Vockler, London, Keane, Little, Davies, Flynn, Cooper
VFL Splatt, Carr, Lewis, Murphy, Scanlon, Hayes, Hopkins

 

New Footy Book On The Market

Book Image thumbnailQueenslander member of the Society, Murray Bird has released a book on the early history of football in that state.

Bird’s place in football history can never be erased – he was the first Queenslander to umpire at AFL level and officiated in 43 games from 1990-94. Yet his contribution to the local football scene goes far, far deeper than that or his 177 local games, including four grand finals.

His working life with what started out as the QAFL, became the QSFL and is now AFLQ, had five different chapters. And each was underpinned by a passion for football that is shared by many in Queensland but topped by none.

He was a development officer for four years, an umpiring development officer for 12 months, junior programs co-ordinator for four years, umpiring manager for four years and football operations manager for four years.

Now Murray has taken on a football historian’s cap and centred his research on Queensland footy and what a job he has done.

Years of research has produced a wonderful book on our game in the northern state and makes fascinating reading.  Here is a short introduction to the period:

Tom Wills, Geelong and Queensland football
In 1866, over a decade before South Australia finally adopted what was then called the Victorian Rules, Queenslanders were playing the Australian game. Prior to the late 1870s Australian Rules football was played in only two colonies, Victoria and Queensland.

All of the schools adopted the game and by the early 1880s the sport had spread throughout Queensland, and was played in places as far flung as Thargomindah, Normanton, Cairns, Cunnamulla and Townsville.

Australian Rules was ‘the game of the colony’ and Queenslanders were enamored with the skill and finesse of a sport that was gradually diverging from its rugby roots during the 1870s.

Some of the founders of football in Queensland were from the famous Geelong Football Club, where the great Tom Wills had played a leading role in the development of the sport.

Wills’ good friends and football teammates at Geelong, George Glencross-Smith and Thomas Board, were at the helm of the Brisbane Football Club when it formed in 1866.

Wills travelled to Central Queensland in 1862 in an ill-fated odyssey to set up a pastoral property with his father, Horatio. His father and 18 others were brutally murdered by a hostile aboriginal tribe in reprisal for atrocities committed by previous colonists. Wills was absent from the property collecting supplies, returning to the scene of the massacre only hours after it had occurred.

His brothers Horace and Cedric were soon summoned to Queensland to assist with the property as the distraught Wills eventually returned to his luminous cricket and football careers in Victoria. Horace and Cedric Wills were both useful players for Geelong in the early 1860s. When they visited Brisbane they would play Australian Rules football with their Geelong mates.

Another Brisbane Football Club founder, Charles Wallen, played for Scotch College in the school matches of 1858 that were the precursor to codification of Australian Rules. The Hart brothers, Fred, Studholme and Graham, were also members of the Brisbane Football Club in its early years. They played for the Albert Park club in some of the first games of Australian Rules before they travelled to Queensland.

Victorians kicked off Australian Rules in Queensland and they were the driving force for football in its first decade.

By 1869 the grammar schools of Brisbane and Ipswich had adopted the code and by the mid-1870s they were beginning to provide graduates to the football clubs of southeast Queensland. In the early 1880s some of these young men were venturing to regional Queensland as accountants, schoolteachers, civil servants and lawyers. When they arrived in places like Maryborough, Gympie, Toowoomba, Warwick, Mackay and Charters Towers they commenced Australian Rules football clubs.

By 1884 there were over 50 Australian Rules clubs throughout Queensland, and only two rugby clubs in the township of Rockhampton.Promotion poster thumbnail

Two of the strongest clubs were Ipswich (The Athenians) and Brisbane (Red Invincibles). The teams were, by the early 1880s, filled with the old boys of the Brisbane and Ipswich Grammar Schools. Victorian influence on the code had waned and it was local Queenslanders who were playing and administering the code.

Crowds would flock to the Queen’s Park in the Brisbane Botanical Gardens to see the Athenians and Red Invincibles fight out matches that were almost always close and often violent. There was no love lost between Queensland’s two biggest towns.

All of this was to change after a bitter battle of the codes erupted in 1884. This battle was to shape the course of Australian sporting history for the next 130 years.

YOU can order a copy of the book by completing the order form, just click here.

1960

Threepence smallThis week we updated the 1960 Sydney Football Records Collection online and found them very interesting reading.

This now completes the full quota of Football Records published in that year.  To view, click here.

Unique to this season was the posting of more than one Record per round. Then, the league printed a certain number of Football Records for each particular match which included the team lists of only those competing teams. So in effect, each game received a different Record.

More interestingly is the posting of the full publication of all the Records from the Australian National Football Council Section 2 Championships played at Trumper Park in Sydney over a period of seven days.

With the passage of time and the constant change of administrators at the NSW Football League, this is one series that has been forgotten.

The combatants were: NSW, VFA, Queensland and Canberra, the latter played under that title until midway through the 1970s. Here are the results:

 

DATE WINNER SCORE LOSER SCORE
25 June NSW 14-24 (108) QLD 13-19 (107)
26 June VFA 17-31 (133) Canberra 3-11 (29)
29 June NSW 13-13 (92) Canberra 13-12 (90)
29 June VFA 22-20 (152) QLD 3-7 (25)
2 July Canberra 16-16 (112) QLD 13-10 (88)
3 July VFA 23-24 (162) NSW 8-9 (57)

 

As well, there were some extraordinary lead-up games, particularly the games played during the week.

Before the VFA v Canberra match, Sydney University, who were not competing in the Sydney league that year, 13-11 (99) d Combined Newcastle 6-5 (41).

Frank Dixon - NSW AFL Vice President, State Coach & Captain. Capt Coach Sth Sydney FCIn the match Canberra v Qld, the curtain raiser was East Side v West Side while on the following day, which turned out to be the final in the game VFA v NSW, the Navy 9-16 (70) d Army 4-9 (33).

A very interesting aspect to the 1960 season which a few readers may remember, was the opening of the Frank Dixon (pictured) Stand at Trumper Park. It replaced a dilapidated timber grandstand which was built early in the first decade of last century and stood almost on the corner of Glenmore Road and Hampton Street.  At its best it held 150 people with the change rooms at the top of the stairs, which proved a real problem with players, dodging the females with whirling umbrellas while running to their cold showers after the game.

The new stand was opened on 25 June by Sydney Lord Mayor Harry Jensen and named after a legend of the game in Sydney.  Frank Dixon was a former deputy Lord Mayor of Sydney.

This new stand, since remodelled if not almost destroyed, will seat 1500 people and has first class amenities, including tiled bath and shower rooms and dance hall and refreshment room.

NSW v Subiaco

Ralph Turner 3Over the years a number of Western Australian Clubs have visited Sydney and subsequently played against either Combined Sydney or NSW representative teams.

As far back as 1911 Western Australian teams came when Kalgoolie Railways club won over a Sydney team in their eastern states tour and this was before the rail line had been connected to Perth.

The Western Australian state team visited Sydney on only one occasion and that was in 1949 when they too dished up the NSW team by over 50 points.  NSW has never ventured any further west than Adelaide for interstate participation.

An interesting match was played in August 1959 when the Subiaco club took advantage of the break in their competition to make the trip.  It was reported that the Western Australian club paid five thousand pounds for the visit which included a party of forty five, including twenty seven players.  The clash was the only representative match for NSW that year.

Nine thousand  packed the versatile Trumper Park to see a strong maroon and gold side take the field against what turned out to be a rather hapless NSW combination.

‘Subi’ were a solid outfit who that year fought their way to the WANFL grand final;  they took no prisoners in their systematic demise of NSW on that day.

The locals lost the advantage of a first quarter wind although they had most of the ball.  Their opponents were just too strong and too talented and led at the first change 5-6 to 2-7.

You might say that NSW bounded out of the gates with a brilliant burst in the second quarter with great football through Byrne (father of former VFL player, Michael Byrne), Keay, Harding and onto West’s Terry Ingersoll, who goaled.  There were limited opportunities for the remainder of the period as Subiaco stretched their half time lead to a margin of 13-12 to 6-10.

Only an extreme optimist would suggest a NSW turnabout and unfortunately, there were none in the crowd.

By three quarter time the visitors led by forty points and as the crowd began to exit the venue Subiaco ran away with a 22-25 (157) to 11-19 (85) victory.

Ralph Turner (pictured), then playing with South Sydney, was easily NSW’s best.  But for him at centre half back, the difference in the score would have been much wider. Turner won the Phelan Medal that year with a record 37 votes, then two years later, playing with Sydney Naval, won it again.

Subiaco

5-6

13-12

17-18

22-25 (157)

NSW

2-7

6-10

11-14

11-19 (85)

Best
Subiaco: Peter Amaranti, Terry Williams, Ron Triplett, Don Glass, Charlie Tyson & Reg Hampson
NSW: Ralph Turner, Ray Free, Bruce Christie, Alan Dalton, Kev Batchelor, Lionel Byrne

 

1911 – NSW Team in Adelaide

In 1911 a National Football Carnival was held at Adelaide.

New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia took part in the eight day series which was played on the Adelaide Oval.

New South Wales travelled there by train, stopping off at Broken Hill where they played a game against the local league resulting in the addition of a further 8 Broken Hill players to their team.

While NSW opened the carnival with a game against Victoria on Wednesday 2 August where they were defeated 13-18 (96) to 11-6 (72), the actual carnival was not officially opened until the following Saturday.

We have copied a newspaper article which reports the opening in vivid terms but in particular you should read the ‘warcry’ of the NSW team, which appears at the bottom of the page.  We wonder if current state teams still use this call to arms?

The article is reprinted verbatim:

THE PEOPLE’S GAME

FINE CARNIVAL FOOTBALL

(By our Special Reporter)

The procession of the teams, which took place during the interval between the two matches, was a pretty ceremony.

In single file, headed by their captains, the players marched behind the respective flags borne by the managers. They looked like five big. brightly-coloured caterpillars.
First came Victoria, with a white “V” on the breast of their navy-blue guernsey and a flag to match; then Western Australia in bright green. Their emerald bunting was emblazoned with a golden map of Australia on which was worked a stately black swan. South Australia, in turquoise and brown, had an athletic appearance and Tasmania looked well, with the primrose coloured outline of their heart shaped island on the green guernseys with the rose pink stripes.
New South Wales wore bright blue, and the red blossom of the Waratah was prominent on their pennant.
Having walked once round the oval the teams circled to the centre, where the officials of the council were fathered.
The players were arranged in a hollow square and the Premier Attorney General were introduced to the Managers and Captains. The ceremonial   there however, proved too long for the crowd, who grew tired. No doubt they recognized that the delay would mean that the last few minutes of the second game would be played among evening shadows – and this was precisely what took place.
Cries of “What are we here for?” “Give us football,” and “Get on with the game” were heard. The display finished with the war cries of Tasmania and New South Wales. They were  novel and enlivening. The weird gibberish of the Tasmanians and the vim of the Cornstalks were appreciated to the full. The cries were as follows:


Tasmania

Rick, Rick ricketty dick, – – – –  Hoopla, hoopla, hey;  – – – –  Hyah, hyah, hey, – – – –

Woolangabba, woolangabba, hoo, hoo, hoo,

Washi, washi, yah


New South Wales
:-

Waratah, Waratah, Waratah,

We’re out to win, we’re out to win, we are, we are; Wagga Wagga, Murrumbidgee,

yah, yah,

We’re from sunny New South Wales, – – – –

Hooray, Hooray

Wagga, Wagga. Murrumbidgee, yah, yah. We’re from sunny New South Wales,

Hooray, Hooray, Hoorah.